Dot com services for dot orgs

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Dot com services for dot orgs A number of US companies have designed Web-based services for non-profits. Find out about custom portals, issue-based portals, event planning sites, search engines, and online grants services in Monica Williams useful overview Using .coms to enhance your .org at the Benton Foundation.  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 20 June 2000 | News read more

ICFM sees Internet “assuming critical importance”

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. ICFM sees Internet “assuming critical importance”  15 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis This month’s issue of ICFM Update, the membership body’s newsletter, includes commentary on part III of the Charities Act. Significantly ICFM, recognising changing times, states that “the end of the decade [the 1990s] sees the applications of the Internet assuming critical importance in developing new [fundraising] techniques.” Howard Lake | 10 July 2000 | News read more

Comparison of fundraising in UK and Netherlands

Comparison of fundraising in UK and Netherlands Six Dutch students have compared fundraising in the UK and the Netherlands for their graduation assignment.Six Leisure Management students at the Netherlands Institute for Tourism and Transport Studies in Breda, Holland, have completed a research project comparing fundraising in the UK and in Holland.The report looked at the history of fundraising in each country, the sources of funds, the existence of consultants, legal regulations, volunteering, attitudes to giving, and many other issues. Advertisement Howard Lake | 21 December 2000 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The final report is 175 pages long and is available as an Adobe Acrobat PDF (312 Kb) from UK Fundraising. read more

Justgiving.com launches

Justgiving.com have launched an online donation facility that automatically reclaims tax on online donations on behalf of charities. In this way donors can make Gift Aid donations online and the charity can receive the reclaimed tax automatically.Read UK Fundraising’s report.  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 1 February 2001 | News Justgiving.com launches read more

Click-to-give-for-free sites “a gimmick”

The founder of a failed click-to-give-for-free site declares the onlinefundraising model “a gimmick.”Following the closure of eGiving.com, a click-to-give-for-free Web site designed to raise funds for four aid agencies, its founder Josh Wine told Third Sector magazine that the model was unlikely to succeed. “I don’t think click-to-give is going to be very important – it’s a gimmick,” he said. “The only success has been the Hungersite.” Advertisement The site folded at the end of January 2001 after making only around £600 for its four charity partners Oxfam, ActionAid, Care International and Save the Children Fund. The site aimed to generate 100,000 clicks a day after six months succeeded in generating only 15,000 clicks in total.Launched in October 2000, eGiving was set up with venture capital by four entrepreneurs who met at Oxford University. They planned to sell software products to charities after they had “become a trusted name.”Oxfam was impressed with the site. Corporate Partnerships Manager Malcolm Fleming told Third Sector magazine in October 2000: “we were approached by lots of Internet ‘giving’ projects, but this one is better. It is a no-commission vehicle and looks as if it has the capacity to drivesignificant traffic.” Simon Llewellyn, head of corporate development at Care International, told Third Sector that he expected the site “to do better than thehungersite.com in the US.”Matthew Hunt, PR manager for eGiving, stated in October 2000 that the site was “unashamedly for-profit.” He added “charities go to their supporters and corporate donors to tell them about this project. This is not an adjunct to their fundraising activities, this is part of the future forfundraising, offer low costs and high returns.”The short future of this particular dot com venture can be partly explained by this business view. If eGiving did rely on charities to help them find corporate donors, then they were being unrealistic. Not surprisingly, charities would be unwilling to work hard to help another company find corporate supporters, and very soon such a partner would become very much “an adjunct to their fundraising activities.”UK Fundraising’s Howard Lake warned of the negative elements involved in click-to-give-for-free sites at the time of the launch. Third Sector reported that he “congratulated the site for involving major players – Citibank, GroupTrade and Ask Jeeves are the current sponsors – but emphasised the disadvantages to fundraisers of anonymous online fundraising.”The attitude of the charities involved could well have been unrealistic. For example, Third Section quotes a spokesperson from ActionAid saying: “We are disappointed that what looked like an easy form of fundraising hasn’t worked. It’s another sign that e-commerce is fraught with difficulties.”While this doesn’t mean that the other partner charities shared this view, it is still alarming that a large international charity can still see Internet fundraising as an easy option. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  12 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 9 March 2001 | News Click-to-give-for-free sites “a gimmick” About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

Mixed response to Home Office plans from Charity Finance Directors’ Group

first_imgcollections -CFDG response.doc76.5 KB About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 3 December 2003 | News Tagged with: Charity Finance Group Community fundraising Finance Law / policy  44 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Advertisement Mixed response to Home Office plans from Charity Finance Directors’ Group The Charity Finance Directors’ Group (CFDG) today gave a mixed response to Home Office proposals for new regulations on how charities undertake public collections.Replying to a Home Office consultation, CFDG welcomed the Government’s proposal that street and face-to-face collections should come under a modernised and comprehensive system of regulations. They endorsed plans for local authorities to have the power to refuse charities permission to undertake face-to-face collections where such collections would cause ‘public nuisance’ or where the area targeted did not have enough ‘capacity’ to sustain the collecting.They warned however, that the planned ‘Lead Local Authority’ system, with local authorities assuming the Charity Commission’s current role in determining charities’ general suitable to collect, was unworkable.Instead, CFDG urged that the Charity Commission should decide which charities were eligible, ensuring greater consistency and transparency.Francis Ingham, CFDG’s Policy and Campaigns Manger, said: “The charitable sector warmly welcomes Government plans to modernise how collections are regulated. It is right that face-to-office collections should be regulated effectively -that’s manifestly in the interests both of the sector itself and of the giving public.“However, the plan for a ‘Lead Local Authority’ system is simply unworkable. It would be inconsistent and cost both charities and local authorities substantial amounts of time and money. A far better option is to let the Charity Commission decide whether individual charities should be allowed to undertake collections: that’s the course we’ll be urging on the Government.”For further information, please contact: Francis Ingham at CFDG on Tel: 020 7793 1400A copy of CFDG’s response is attached below.Notes to Editor: 1. The Charity Finance Directors’ Group was set up in 1987 and is an umbrella group that specialises in helping charities to manage their finance-related functions. 2. CFDG’s 900 plus members are responsible for the finances of charities with a wide variety of income levels. Over 60% of the top 500 charities are members of the CFDG. Between them our members manage some £10 Billion in charity income per year.last_img read more

Google expands share of online search users

first_img Tagged with: Digital Individual giving Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Charity Web managers should still be focusing on securing a high ranking on search engine Google, given that it continues to increase its share of people using search engines.If you’ve only got limited time and budget to promote your charity’s Web site, it still makes sense to focus on ensuring it is listed effectively on Google. According to OneStat, the search engine increased its share of search engine uesrs from 55.2% last year to 56.4% this year.Rival search engines lost market share, apart from Ask Jeeves and AOL who secured slight increases. Advertisement Howard Lake | 14 June 2004 | News  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img However, as we have said before on UK Fundraising and in our training courses, there are other search engines to consider and Google’s dominance is unlikely to be permanent. Yahoo! has been working hard at competing with Google, Amazon has already launched a new search engine, and Dipsie is just one of several promising new search engines due to launch in 2004. Google expands share of online search users About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Hospice lottery celebrates another jackpot year

first_img Lichfield charity St Giles Hospice has raised £1,035,316 with its weekly draw in the year to March 2004, beating the previous year’s total of £1 million.The lottery has now raised over £4 million in its seven-year history. It was established after the National Lottery Charities Board, now the Big Lottery Fund, turned down its application for £190,000.Taking part in the lottery costs £1 per week, and each weekly draw offers over £3,000 in prizes, including a £2,000 jackpot. Advertisement  33 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Gaming Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Hospice lottery celebrates another jackpot yearcenter_img Howard Lake | 16 August 2004 | News All lottery players receive a card that earns them a discount, usually 10%, at more than 100 local shops and businesses. Those who sign up for a full year in advance also receive a limited edition teddy bear.The hospice’s Promotions’ Commercial Manager Richard Simmonite claims that the weekly draw is the most successful of kits kind anywhere in the UK. Its income funds care for one in four of the hospice’s patients.The lottery is run by St Giles Hospice (Promotions) Ltd, the trading subsidiary of the hospice, a registered charity. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

New book on volunteering by older people

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 22 March 2005 | News The Institute for Volunteering Research has published “Active ageing in active communities: Volunteering and the transition to retirement” by Justin Davis Smith and Pat Gay.The new report, published in association with the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, examines the role of older volunteers within the context of an ageing population, increased life expectancy, and growing governmentinterest in notions of active ageing and community involvement.It focuses both on practical issues, such as recruitment and support of older volunteers, as well as on wider public policy debates relating to demographic change and community participation. Advertisementcenter_img Published in paperback, the 36-page report costs £11.95. New book on volunteering by older people Tagged with: Research / statistics Volunteeringlast_img read more

Celebs line up for World Vision campaign

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Community fundraising Individual giving Ireland Howard Lake | 6 June 2005 | News  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The ask will be ‚€25 per month.center_img Actor and author Pauline McLynn and radio presenter Tom Dunne are fronting a World Vision campaign to recruit 200 child sponsors in Cork. The campaign calls on individuals to become child sponsors to fund long term programmes in communities in east and west Africa. “We are asking people to recognise that not all sponsorship is about football teams, concerts or celebrity weddings,” said Helen Keogh, chief executive, World Vision Ireland. Advertisement Celebs line up for World Vision campaign About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more