Judge Weighs Suit Filed By Former Subway Pitchman’s Ex-Wife

first_img IL for www.theindianalawyer.comAn Indiana judge is set to hear arguments in a lawsuit filed by former Subway pitchman Jared Fogle’s ex-wife alleging that the company knew of Fogle’s sexual interest in children but continued promoting him as its spokesman.Kathleen McLaughlin and Fogle divorced in 2015 after the Indiana man pleaded guilty to trading in child pornography and paying for sex with underage girls. He’s serving a 15-year sentence.Attorneys on both sides will be in court Tuesday for a hearing on Subway’s request that McLaughlin’s lawsuit be dismissed. McLaughlin alleges Subway received at least three reports indicating Fogle was sexually interested in children but failed to take proper action and continued promoting him as its spokesman.The 40-year-old Fogle became Subway’s spokesman after losing 200 pounds, partly by eating Subway sandwiches. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Material interests

first_imgGaylord says she never sketches a plan in advance, but usually starts with the “cradle,” then determines paper, size, and beaded patterns, all while trying “not to be too conscious.” Each book takes her at least 20 hours.While color and texture primarily drive Gaylord’s paper choices — amate from Mexico, lokta from Nepal — there are other considerations. “A lot of Western art papers are made from rags and linens, but most papers I use are made from inner bark of trees,” giving the books a close connection to their wooden bases, she says.Gaylord made her first spirit book, “Sewn Prayer,” in 1992 and just recently finished her 100th, “Returning Embrace.”,“Oaks are symbols of longevity and endurance.”,“The emptiness within the circles provides a space for meditation.”,“The circle is a symbol of timelessness.” Close-up photos capture wonder of a walk through the Arboretum Susan Kapuscinski Gaylord wants her “spirit books” to look so natural, “If I placed one on the ground in the woods, you’d walk right by it.”People are stopping and taking notice, though, at the Arnold Arboretum, where 14 of the books are on view through July 22 — not in the woods, but in display cases in the visitor center.Sheryl White, the Arboretum’s coordinator of visitor engagement, first saw the Newburyport artist’s sculptures last year and thought they would be a good fit for the nature reserve. Gaylord had even gathered the sweetgum seed pods that form the spiky base for one of her books, “Chambered Congruity,” at the Arboretum. Seeing the forest through the trees Relatedlast_img read more

Following Fruits and Vegetables from Farm to Your Table

first_imgStrawberries and baby arugula in January. Broccoli rabe and artichokes in July. We want fruits and vegetables in and out of season at our favorite restaurant and on our dining room table.Produce man Charlie Rooney sums it up best: “Consumers want everything, every day.”Charlie Rooney, left, kids with produce broker Frank Monte at the Philadelphia Produce Market.The Sea Bright produce wholesaler (C. Rooney Pro­duce) has not taken a day off since he started the business in the 1980s and isn’t planning one soon. Several nights a week, you can find Rooney spending the overnight hours on a road trip to the modern South Philadelphia Produce Market.Rooney buys produce for 75 customers so the fruits and vegetables they serve their diners are of the highest quality and freshness.“We arrive at the market around 8 p.m.,” says Rooney, “and it takes about five hours to assemble and stage the orders at one of the 100 bays. Then the hundreds of individual boxes, crates and trays have to be carefully loaded onto the 24-foot straight truck – like a complicated puzzle – in the exact way they will be unloaded for my customers in the hours ahead.”Rooney has his business philosophy on his truck’s sides and roll-up door: Big Enough To Serve, Small Enough To Care.“I live it,” he smiles.He has kept his customer base manageable and in relatively close proximity so that he can assure them when they open for business their order has been delivered and placed in storage in the manner they have specified.“It’s truly personal service,” emphasizes Rooney, who uses two vehicles to deliver when he returns to Mon­mouth County. His team does not finish up until about 10 a.m. – some 16 hours after the trip began. And, they repeat it up to two more times each week – week in, week out.From left, Brandon Gebhardt, Charlie Rooney and Eddie Giron fuel up for the trip to the produce market.The route vegetables and fruits take from farm to plate is a long one but surprisingly quick. Domestic fresh produce leaves farms in the South and West in the winter and nationwide in the summer to arrive at regional produce markets (New York City, Boston, Dallas, Miami, Chicago, and the like) in the middle and end of each week. Fruits and vegetables from Central and South America – shipped by air – are timed for similar arrivals during the winter months.In a 24/7 operation, decades-old family-owned “direct receivers” buy and stock produce at these regional facilities. They inventory boxes, crates, trays and bags of everything from raspberries to radishes, apples to artichokes.Many supermarkets have buyers who purchase for multiple stores or by region. Large warehouse stores like Costco, BJ’s and Walmart may bypass the produce markets entirely and deal directly with growers on mega-purchases to be distributed nationally. Restaur­ants, Rooney explains, still establish relationships with local or regional wholesalers who supply their needs daily and weekly.What makes small businesses like Rooney’s unique is how the relationship with customers transcends just business.“I know all my customers on a first-name basis,” he says, “and have dealt with them for years,” as he shakes a large ring with dozens of keys. “These are keys to my customers’ buildings and I deliver to their storerooms during the middle of the night, placing their order where they want it so it is not in the way when they arrive early for their business day.”The path these fresh commodities then take to your table is varied. “I have long-term relationships with the family produce companies,” he says. “I have worked with a Philadelphia broker for decades. He assures I get what I want for my customers at the right price.”Although Rooney has bought direct from the receivers, he and much of his competition now work closely with professional buyers. Rooney met second-generation Philadelphia produce broker Frank Monte nearly 20 years ago and has established a strong business partnership.“Let me explain how it works,” Rooney says as the truck rumbles down I-295 toward the City of Brotherly Love on Monday night. “I call my orders into Monte just before I leave for the market. Frank sources all my orders from one of the two dozen receivers at the center looking not only for the best price but the best quality.” Rooney explains that Monte knows the market and has an eye on what is coming in daily that Rooney regularly buys.When Rooney’s truck arrives at the loading dock, Monte has his orders sourced and instructions (picking tickets) waiting for Rooney’s assistants. Eddie Giron has been with Rooney for 20 years. Brandon Gephardt has been aboard about two years. Both men snooze in the truck cab on the way to the market knowing they have a long night and morning ahead.Driving motorized forklifts, Giron and Gephardt whiz around the market like race car drivers picking up orders. After schmoozing with the night sales staff and Monte, Rooney retreats to the cab of the truck for three hours of sleep. “Not many owners of produce companies are the buyer, the driver and delivery person,” he says. “I need to catch 40 winks to be able to drive back to Monmouth County refreshed and ready to make deliveries.”Rooney emphasizes how important it is to get the truck loaded correctly. “We don’t have time to be looking for two boxes of asparagus on the third stop in New Jersey at 3 a.m. at a customer’s back door. It has to be where we can get it as soon as we stop.”Rooney starts making deliveries soon after he crosses into New Jersey. The strawberries for a customer in Howell need to be where he can put his hands on them a few hours later. A large sub shop chain needs lettuce and tomatoes – and lots of them – as soon as they open for the breakfast crowd. Customers not only get their produce but bills so they know costs immediately allowing them to price and plan accordingly.Sea Bright produce wholesaler Charlie Rooney starts down the long, center aisle at the South Philadelphia Produce Market.The Rooney family arrived in Sea Bright from Jersey City in 1962. Charlie Rooney’s dad, the late Charles Jr., served as a councilman for years and mayor of the town for two terms. His mom Frances has staffed the family hot dog cart on Ocean Avenue since the late 1970s. It had been the summer job growing up for young Rooney and his sister Fran. Mrs. Rooney, now 80, shows no sign of closing the (what is now) Sea Bright institution. “Like my mother Frances, I am a Capricorn,” Rooney says, “and I am a workaholic, a lot like her and will probably be working too into my 80s.”Rooney got into the business by accident. While recovering from a serious knee injury suffered training for a triathlon, he began to sell vegetables from a road stand near the hot dog cart.“I was paying way too much for vegetables from a wholesaler,” he said. With guidance from people in the business, Rooney began to buy his own produce from a wholesale market in Newark. “When fall arrived, I needed to find something to replace the road stand,” he said. The manager of Ichabod’s (now Woody’s) in Sea Bright asked Rooney to supply him with the juice oranges he used for his famous screwdriver cocktail. Rooney found a supplier, made the sale and as he quips, “one customer led to two, three four and the rest is history.”In 1996 Rooney and his wife Marisol purchased a small deli opposite The Grove on Broad Street in Shrews­bury. They renamed it Stroker’s. Today, the small deli has a huge following for quality breakfast and lunch fare. And yes, Rooney keeps his wife well supplied with produce.Rooney feels he is one of a dying breed of family-owned produce wholesalers. “Today, everyone wants to be bigger,” he says. “My philosophy is to stay the right size to serve my customers’ different needs. I want them to succeed and prosper and if they do well, I too will do well. It’s a win-win situation.”“It’s a demanding business but I love it,” says Rooney heading for home for some needed sleep. He’d have it no other way.Feature writer Art Petro­semolo spent an overnight with Rooney and crew jammed into the cab of his truck. He walked wide-eyed through the Philadelphia Market and came away (along with a huge tray of fresh strawberries) with a new respect for how his vegetables arrive on his plate each day. By Art PetrosemoloSea Bright’s Charlie Rooney is ‘The Produce Man’last_img read more

Paul Graham: Priority Access to Twitter Is Practical Necessity

first_imgIf hardcore hackers had any doubts whether the real-time web was a legitimate development environment, Y Combinator co-founder Paul Graham is dispelling them. In an interview with Graham, ReadWriteWeb learned that the entrepreneur-turned-investor issued a “Request for Startups” (RFS) asking for ideas from companies utilizing Twitter and Justin.tv’s live video API. Groups who are accepted to Y-Combinator and fall under these categories will be given “priority access” to Twitter and Justin.tv. Says Graham, “In the beginning people believed Twitter was a fad and they didn’t realize this was a new protocol…In some ways Twitter is a replacement for email. We’re not doing this to promote Twitter, we genuinely believe it’s important.” It’s obvious why Y Combinator companies are able to gain special support from Justin.tv’s founders. The lifecasting site took on Y Combinator seed funding in 2007 and has since developed into one of the web’s leading online video destinations. The Twitter partnership is a different story. While it’s important that Y Combinator teams have Twitter’s support, the question on many people’s minds is, “If Twitter is an all-important protocol, then why should one group of investors get privileged access to its data-rich firehose?”According to Graham, “This is a practical matter. They need to be able to keep ahead of growth technically… If thousands of startups want to talk to you, then you need to have filters. Even before publishing this Request for Startups, we had a dedicated guy at Twitter who answered Y Combinator questions.” In the past, Y Combinator-funded real-time meta-search engine Scoopler worked closely with Twitter. Said Graham, “Honestly, Twitter probably has a lot of filters on those who access them. The only thing special about this is that we formalized it with an RFS.” After taking a $2 million dollar investment from Sequoia Capital in March, Y Combinator aims to increase its portfolio companies from 40 to roughly 60 per year. The “Request for Startups” offers companies direction in their applications. Graham notes that when individuals apply for Y Combinator, they are asked to specify if they are applying with an RFS in mind. While he estimates that only 10% of applications are directly related to the RFS, he believes that many who might not apply are inspired to do so after seeing their ideas highlighted. The incubator’s first requests were issued in August with a call for alternative journalism and online retail ideas. Tags:#Interviews#start#startups dana oshiro Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

Pep delighted with Aguero & Jesus

first_imgManchester City Aguero and Jesus partnership delights Guardiola Ben Spratt Last updated 2 years ago 23:51 25/9/2017 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) AgueroJesus - cropped Getty Images Manchester City Premier League Manchester City v Shakhtar Donetsk UEFA Champions League Sergio Agüero Guardiola The two strikers have been in fine scoring form this season, but it is their other work that most pleases the Citizens boss Pep Guardiola believes Manchester City striker Sergio Aguero has moved to the next level this season and has been pleased with his link-up play with Gabriel Jesus.Aguero has scored seven goals in seven matches in all competitions this term, continuing his fine form to move within one of City’s all-time scoring record ahead of their Champions League meeting with Shakhtar Donetsk on Tuesday.City -2 11/10 with dabblebet Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing But Guardiola feels Aguero is now about more than just the goals as he offers the team a different option in attack.”I think the qualities that [Aguero] had in the past are the same,” the City manager told a pre-match news conference. “Maybe now we play more with him, not just in the finishing department.”Before, Sergio just scored a goal. Now, when John [Stones], Nico [Otamendi], Fernandinho and Yaya [Toure] have the ball, we know he is there and that helps to be more involved.”Jesus has also hit the ground running this season with five goals of his own, but Guardiola has also been impressed with his selfless work for the team.”Now we have five strikers I trust,” he added. “There is no doubt about his ability, his impact since he arrived, on and off the pitch. I am delighted with him.PEP: On and off the pitch. I am delighted with @gabrieljesus33. He helps Sergio score, helps our pressing and dynamic. He’s so important.— Manchester City (@ManCity) September 25, 2017″He helps Sergio to score goals, in our pressing and dynamism and fighting, in a lot of things that maybe we didn’t have. With him, we have it. He is so important.”The most important thing is age. He is so young and a number nine striker from Brazil. He trains every day and fights every game and has the desire to become a really good player in world football.”Guardiola was also asked about the development of young players at the Etihad Stadium after Pablo Maffeo hit the headlines for his marking of Lionel Messi while on loan at Girona, with the City manager believing such moves prove beneficial.He said: “I’ve always said that Premier League second teams don’t compete very well. They [City’s young players] need this kind of competition.”If they can’t play in the first team they need to go in other leagues and play in those big games and face players like Messi. That’s the best way to improve.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

REBECCA’S GDO POSTCARD FROM THE EDGE…

first_imgIn the second installment of our behind the scenes look at the life and times of the Nation’s Game Development Officers, the Northern Territory’s Rebecca Houston delivers her “Postcard from the Edge” from Australia’s Top End.Last month Queensland’s North Queensland GDO Glenn ‘Richo’ Richardson was featured, this month, Rebecca ‘Chewbeckker’ Houston gives us a sneak peak of her life as a GDO in “The Territory”.Rebecca Houston is promoting Touch Football in some of Australia’s most remote communities, and loving it. The 27-year-old has been in the Game Development Officer role for a little over a year, having moved to Darwin from South-East Queensland when her boyfriend Luke joined the Northern Territory Police Force. Even though she is still relatively new to her job, Houston has an accomplished background in Touch Football.Houston played with Crushers in the Women’s Open SEQTL from 1999-2005, and the Gold Coast Sharks in the National Touch League from 1998-2005. She won an NTL Open Mixed title with ‘Sharkies’ in 2001, and in 2004 she represented the Queensland State of Origin Mixed Open team. Renowned as one of the best ‘finishers’ in the business, the speedster has played a pivotal role in the Barbarians Women’s Open Team’s surge into the semi-finals at the National Touch League for the last two years and continues to prove her mettle under the pressure at the Elite level.The bubbly and dedicated Redlands girl has adjusted well to life as a GDO.Initially moving away from her close knit family and the bright lights of Brisbane was a big adjustment, but the positive and enthusiastic extrovert jumped at the chance to make a career out of the game she has played since she was a teenager in the local Redlands competition.Rebecca has made friends easily and impressed all those around her with her eagerness to work, and willingness to embrace the people and lifestyle in the Territory.Northern Territory Branch Manager Isobel Appo is one person who has keenly observed Rebecca’s progress and is full of praise for the GDO.“Rebecca has done very well. Her AusTouch programs and Junior initiatives have gone over well in the Territory. She has a great rapport with the kids, and her hard work, sense of humour, and genuine desire to help people shines through. She has earned a lot of respect and acceptance in the communities in which she works,” Mrs. Appo said.Rebecca is doing a great job passing on the skills she has honed over her years at the top level to kids in communities that have often never even heard of any kind of football other than AFL. Rebecca recently visited Kalkarindji, Yarralin and Timber Creek in the Katherine Region to run Austouch clinics for 60 children over three days. “By visiting the communities, you get a lot of satisfaction from going out there and teaching them a sport that they’ve never really seen before. Most of the time out in the communities they’ve only seen AFL, so they play AFL. They’ve seen a little bit of Rugby League on the television and that’s about it. So your biggest battle is getting them to pass the ball backwards. Once you get them passing the ball backwards they start to understand what they’re doing and they start to get really excited, it’s a good feeling,” Houston said. Rebecca enjoys the travelling that is part of her Game Development Officer duties. She said she is always welcomed into any community that she visits and appreciates the laid back lifestyle on offer in the Territory. “Everyone loves playing sport, it doesn’t matter what sport it is, people get into it. The kids are always smiling and make you feel so welcome. There is so much natural athleticism and skill as well in the Indigenous communities, and of course it’s very rewarding to give people opportunities that they might not otherwise get in the remote localities,” Houston said.Having covered several communities across the Top End, Houston said she has noticed something about the kids from rural communities compared to the Darwin-based children. “They’re a lot less cheeky!” Houston said with a smile. In June Houston will be travelling to isolated communities in remote Arnhem Land. “I’ve been up to Gove before, but I haven’t been to see their community sport teams so that’ll be good.” Houston said.Houston is dedicated to getting more children involved in Touch Football. Without her work developing Touch Football at the grassroots level the game in the Northern Territory would be struggling for a base. A junior competition that has been established in Darwin is evidence of her work.“We originally had four teams and this year we’ve got eight teams, from under-13s to under-16s. Next year we hope to grow it again so it’s definitely getting bigger. The main thing I want to do is just keep growing it for the children and getting them involved. If we don’t get the kids involved then our sport doesn’t grow and we cease to exist.” Rebecca said.By the end of this year Houston is planning to have a junior competition established in the Katherine region. Her Austouch clinics will hopefully have planted the Touch Football seed in some of tomorrow’s stars. But Houston knows that the kids can only develop their Touch Football skills if competitions are set up for them.“I’m going down to Katherine in August. They are starting a school competition, so hopefully they can get a little bit more interest there for their club so that they can start a junior competition themselves. It would be very rewarding. It is good to say that you’ve started something outside of Darwin, it means that you’re not just focusing on one area and that’s a good outcome for the sport.” Houston said.The Northern Territory is going ahead in leaps and bounds, with the formation of several junior competitions, AusTouch programs, and next month’s NT Junior Development Camp set to further consolidate the Top End’s position as a leading light for junior development in Touch Football in this Country.With the rapid growth of the sport in junior ranks in the Territory, Rebecca Houston is sure to have her hands full for some time to come.last_img read more

Markets Right Now Stocks end mostly higher

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):4 p.m.Stocks struggled to a mostly higher finish on Wall Street as gains for energy, phone and industrial companies made up for losses elsewhere.The Dow Jones industrial average was held back by a loss in Apple. Other indexes closed higher.Hess and Verizon each rose 2 per cent.Some health insurers turned higher as support dwindled for the Senate Republicans’ latest effort to roll back the Affordable Care Act. Molina Healthcare jumped 4.5 per cent.The Standard & Poor’s 500 rose 1 point, or 0.1 per cent, to 2,502.The Dow fell 9 points, less than 0.1 per cent, to 22,349. The Nasdaq rose 4 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 6,426.Small-company stocks did better than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 rose 6 points, or 0.5 per cent, to 1,450, a record.___11:45 a.m.Stock indexes are slightly lower in midday trading on Wall Street as the market heads for its second decline in a row.Health care and technology stocks pulled the market lower Friday. UnitedHealth, a major insurer, dropped 2.2 per cent and Apple gave up 1.7 per cent.Banks also fell. Bank of America lost 1.2 per cent.Sprint jumped 4.6 per cent after Reuters reported it was getting close to signing a deal with T-Mobile.The Standard & Poor’s 500 slipped 2 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 2,498.The Dow Jones industrials fell 13 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 22,343. The Nasdaq lost 7 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 6,415.Small-company stocks did better than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 index rose 4 points, or 0.3 per cent, to 1,448.___9:35 a.m.Stocks are opening slightly lower on Wall Street as technology companies and banks decline.Apple fell another 1 per cent early Friday as investors give a tepid reception to its new lineup of iPhones.Financial stocks are down as bond yields decline. Bank of America lost 1.2 per cent.Sprint jumped 4 per cent after Reuters reported it was getting close to signing a deal with T-Mobile.The Standard & Poor’s 500 slipped 2 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 2,498.The Dow Jones industrials fell 13 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 22,343. The Nasdaq lost 7 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 6,415.Bond prices rose as tensions with North Korea escalated. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.25 per cent.last_img read more

Pending for over 2 yrs rlys instructs zones to expedite handover of

first_imgNew Delhi: Railways has instructed its zones to expedite the process of handing over retiring rooms and dormitories at railway stations to IRCTC, which have been pending for over two years, so that they can not only be developed and upgraded but also facilitate online booking.In a letter issued by the railway board on May 2, railways has instructed all zones to expedite the process of signing agreements with the Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) to hand over such facilities. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh”We intend to upgrade the retiring rooms to international standards in hospitality offerings with facilities like quality mattresses and linen, almirah/locker for luggage, LED TV, telephone and intercom, firefighting equipment, potable water and room heaters. The services will be linked with local sightseeing and tours and travel services that the IRCTC has been successfully managing,” a senior IRCTC official said. Railways currently manages around 2,000 retiring rooms or dormitories at more than 600 stations. The facility is meant to provide reasonable safe transit accommodation to bona fide passengers, who can book a retiring room for a maximum of 72 hours. Also Read – Personal life needs to be respected: Cong on reports of Rahul’s visit abroadIRCTC will allow bookings in slots – – ranging from three hours, 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours – -, an official said while stating the prices for the same will vary from station to station. The then Railway Minister Suresh Prabhu had in his 2016-17 budget speech announced that “retiring rooms will be handed over to IRCTC to ensure that these can be managed in a professional manner.” It was then that railways had issued policy guidelines to all its zonal divisions to put the process into action and the IRCTC was asked to prepare a phase-wise road map for the takeover.last_img read more

32 hurt as Tunisia strike turns violent source

first_imgSILIANA, Tunisia: Thirty-two people were injured, nearly all of them Tunisian police, when a strike degenerated into violence in the town of Siliana, southwest of the capital, a hospital source said Thursday.The violence erupted on Wednesday when protesters clashed with police in Siliana and Gafsa, another marginalised town where they torched an office of the ruling Islamist party Ennahda.Of those injured in Siliana, 30 were members of the police force who suffered mainly slight injuries to their heads and faces, said the hospital source, adding the two others were youths with leg wounds. All of them had since been discharged from hospital.Wednesday’s clashes erupted when dozens of demonstrators marked the first anniversary of violence that left more than 300 people injured during anti-government demonstrations.The clashes lasted late into the night, with the protesters hurling rocks at police and placing burning tyres in the town centre as the police tried to disperse them by driving into the crowd and firing tear gas.Calm had returned to Siliana on Thursday morning, when the extent of the violence became apparent with trees charred, signs torn down and debris littering its streets.The regions of Siliana, Gafsa and Gabes ground to a halt on Wednesday as strikes were observed to protest against poverty and lack of development.Those were driving factors behind the popular uprising that toppled veteran strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali nearly three years ago and sparked revolutions across the region.last_img read more

OSU defensive end Nick Bosa creating his own image as a Buckeye

OSU freshman defensive end Nick Bosa (97) makes a tackle on Indiana sophomore running back Mike Majette (24) during the first half on Oct. 8. The Buckeyes won 38-17. Credit: Alexa MavrogianisWith Ohio State leading 31-17 near the 10-minute mark of the fourth quarter against Indiana, coach Urban Meyer needed a defensive stop. He sent in the goal line package to combat a fourth-and-one at the OSU four yard line.A score by the Hoosiers would put OSU on its heels for the rest of the game. But a familiar No. 97 in scarlet didn’t allow that to happen. Freshman defensive end Nick Bosa penetrated Indiana’s offensive line and made the initial hit on junior running back Devine Redding, halting him at the line of scrimmage and forcing the Indiana offense to retreat to the sideline still trailing by 14. There was no shrug, no hair sticking out of the back of the younger Bosa’s helmet, only a roar from a crowd of over 107,000 embracing Bosa for who he is, not who his brother was.“I was just excited to get on the field on fourth down and have the opportunity to make the play for my team,” Bosa said. “They put the people in on goal line for a reason, just knocked them back, shed the block and made a tackle for loss.”It’s fairly safe to say that anybody who paid attention to OSU football, or the realm of college football, knows the name Joey Bosa. As a two-time All-American, two-time first-team All-Big Ten, 2014 Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year and third-overall draft pick, the older Bosa set a precedent with the Buckeyes that his younger brother has almost unfairly been forced to meet.Nick Bosa said he knows there is pressure, but he doesn’t necessarily feel it because of his confidence in his abilities.“I didn’t listen to the hype too much,” Bosa said. “Coach (Larry Johnson) made it very easy for me to transition and he knew that there was going to be some pressure. But he kept working on getting me better and my teammates helped me too.”Coming off of a torn ACL in his final high-school season at St. Thomas Aquinas in Florida, Bosa wasn’t able to participate in camp when he enrolled in Columbus last spring. Defensive line coach Larry Johnson has been in charge of bringing Bosa along at a pace he’s comfortable with, just one year after a serious injury.Associate head coach and co-defensive coordinator Greg Schiano said Johnson has done a remarkable job with Bosa, especially given the skillset of the No. 1 consensus weakside defensive end in the 2016 recruiting class.“For a guy his age to do the things he does physically … it’s rare,” Schiano said. “He’s very strong and he plays with great technique which young guys usually don’t. He’s well-trained.”Bosa made four tackles against Indiana last week, including 1.5 tackles for loss. For the season, he has 13 total tackles, four tackles for loss and two sacks. At this time in Joey Bosa’s freshman year, he had 10 tackles and no tackles for loss or sacks. As time trots forward, Bosa may take on a larger role for Meyer and the defense.Bosa said it took a couple games for him to get acclimated again after rehabilitating his injury. However, it’s becoming more apparent each week that Bosa is on a path to becoming a dominant force on the defensive line.“We probably just have to play him probably a bit more as he’s getting healthy and more involved in the defense,” Meyer said after the game. “So obviously he’s a guy that, the last name, high expectations. I think he’s starting to fulfill them.” read more