Black History Month United States Colored Troops

first_img Locally 500 members of the United States Colored Troops who fought during the Civil War are buried at the Wilmington National Cemetery at the rear left end of the cemetery. Confederates soldiers (white or colored) were not allowed to be buried in any United States military cemetery across the country due to the fact that the Confederates withdrew from the Union.AmenRa says, “The United States Colored Troops played a significant part in Black History, turning the Civil War into a victory for the Union and leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation .There should be more in our educational system about the United States Colored Troops.”Patrick says, she learned her history from her mother through her great-grandmother, Fannie Perkins Williams, a former slave captive.Related Article: Trump signs bill named for Sen. McCain, doesn’t mention him“If it was not for me listening to my mother, I would have missed this important part of our family’s history,” says AmenRa.Their names include her Great Grandfather PVT Henry Williams, Great-Granduncles CPL Dennis Perkins (Shimes) and CPL James Perkins (Shimes) along with CPL David Jackson her Great-great grandfather.The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments of the United States Army during the American Civil War (1861-1865) that were composed of African American (“colored”) soldiers. First recruited in 1863, for the Civil War, the men of the 175 regiments (approximately 175,000 soldiers) of the USCT constituted approximately one-tenth of the Union Army. The Union needed the manpower to win the war. If it had not been for the U.S.C.T. the Union would not have won the Civil War. If the Union had lost the war the Emancipation of Proclamation would not have been issued. The men of the USCT were the forerunners of the well-known Buffalo Soldiers, who fought in the Indian Wars later in the nineteenth century and received their nickname in the American West.Locally 500 members of the United States Colored Troops who fought during the Civil War are buried at the Wilmington National Cemetery at the rear left end of the cemetery. Confederates soldiers (white or colored) were not allowed to be buried in any United States military cemetery across the country due to the fact that the Confederates withdrew from the Union. TheU.S.C.T. was recently acknowledged here in Wilmington, NC in 2011. A historical marker is placed on Market street by the Wilmington National Cemetery this effort was led by Retired Sgt. Fred Johnson. WWAY’s Amanda Fitzpatrick interviewed Sonya Patrick (AmenRa) about her family and learned that she has 4 descendants of the United States Colored Troops.The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments of the United States Army during the American Civil War (1861-1865) that were composed of African American (“colored”) soldiers. First recruited in 1863, for the Civil War, the men of the 175 regiments (approximately 175,000 soldiers) of the USCT constituted approximately one-tenth of the Union Army. The Union needed the manpower to win the war. If it had not been for the U.S.C.T. the Union would not have won the Civil War. If the Union had lost the war the Emancipation of Proclamation would not have been issued. The men of the USCT were the forerunners of the well-known Buffalo Soldiers, who fought in the Indian Wars later in the nineteenth century and received their nickname in the American West.- Advertisement – last_img read more