Jamaicans Urged To Assist War Veterans By Donating To Poppy Appeal

first_img This has been the goal of the Island Council for Jamaica Legion, which maintains the Curphey Home in Newport, Manchester. Story Highlights Jamaicans are being encouraged to assist in the welfare of the country’s ex-service men, by donating to the cause. Through its annual National Poppy Appeal, now underway, the legion is seeking to raise funds to maintain the home. As the world community prepares to recognize the sacrifices of war veterans on Remembrance Day, Monday, November 11, Jamaicans are being encouraged to assist in the welfare of the country’s ex-service men, by donating to the cause.Having fought valiantly alongside servicemen from other countries, during the two most extensive global conflicts of all time – World War I (1914 to 1918) and World War II (1939 to 1945), it is only fitting that Jamaica’s war veterans be given the opportunity to enjoy their twilight years in comfort.This has been the goal of the Island Council for Jamaica Legion, which maintains the Curphey Home in Newport, Manchester, a residential facility for indigent ex-servicemen and women.Founded in 1958, the home, which is the only establishment of its kind in Jamaica, provides food, clothing and nursing for residents on a daily basis. There are currently 13 residents at the facility.Through its annual National Poppy Appeal, now underway, the legion is seeking to raise funds to maintain the home and assist the welfare of other ex-servicemen across the island.Chairman of the Legion, Colonel (Ret’d) Torrance Lewis, tells JIS News that in addition to running the Curphey Home, the funds go toward the general support of ex-servicemen through grants and pensions.He says that there are approximately 200 veterans still living across the island, who are no longer self-sufficient. The widows are also taken care of even when the war veterans pass on.“We would like people to contribute as much as possible. Every time they see a poppy tin, just drop something in it. That is the main source of getting funds to maintain the health of the ex-service men. Sometimes, they are people who have served before there was the National Insurance Scheme (NIS), they have no medical cover and so we have to finance their entire welfare. We also give the existing ex-service men, those who are needy, we give them a grant each month. In fact, we will be paying out a grant monthly to about 100 ex-servicemen,” he informs.Shortly before and during the observance of Remembrance Day, cans are normally distributed to collect funds in exchange for paper poppies. Colonel Lewis informs that the donation cans and poppies are placed in various stores, banks, and other places. Cadets are also on the streets with tins asking for donations.“We also send out letters to companies and the National Poppy Appeal has different fund raising sessions – band concerts, fish fry… whatever it is, different ways of raising money for the funds, and the aim usually is to try and get as much as would maintain the Curphey Home, which cost in the region of about $6 million or $7 million a year to maintain it,” he notes.Colonel Lewis informs that the Jamaica Legion gets a grant from the Government of about $650,000 a month to assist the ex-soldiers. The Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) and the British World Government League also provide support.For war veteran, Arthur (Roy) Knight, this gesture to improve the lives and recognise the contributions of ex-servicemen is significant, as during the wars, they faced injury and death every day, even while not on duty.Only 20 years old when he enlisted, the now 88 year-old former Right Lieutenant, who served in the Royal Air Force during World War II, tells JIS News that he risked his life to serve his country and to ensure a free world.“If Germany had won the war, we would be slaves. So I felt very well to have served. (Adolph) Hitler wasn’t a nice man you know? Hitler was a serious man; he wanted to conquer the world,” he asserts.There were about 4, 000 to 5,000 Jamaicans, who were involved in the wars. Many Jamaicans served in the Royal Air Force. Others joined the ground forces of the British army and the Canadian forces.The nation will celebrate Remembrance Day or Veterans’ Day (as it is referred to in the United States) on Sunday, November 10, with the annual Memorial Day ceremony at the War Memorial epitaph, National Heroes Park.The day is observed in Jamaica on the Sunday closest to the November 11 day, when the First World War came to an end.In addition to the national ceremony, which will feature cannon blasts and moments of silence for the veterans, Remembrance Day celebrations will be held island-wide. Members of the public are invited to attend any of these ceremonies at epitaphs in all parish capitals, which are organised by the custodes and parish councils.The National Heroes Park celebrations will include: uniformed groups parade and laying of floral tributes by the Governor-General, the Prime Minister, the Leader of the Opposition, the Chief Justice, Mayor of Kingston, JDF Chief of Defence Staff, Commissioner of Police, as well as several representatives from the diplomatic corps.The Commissioner of Corrections, Chairman of the Jamaica Legion and representatives of St. John Ambulance and the Royal Air Force, will also place floral tributes in memory for those who died in the war while serving the country.last_img read more

Market Challenges Cut Milahas Quarterly Earnings

first_imgzoom Qatar-based marine transport and logistics conglomerate Qatar Navigation (Milaha) has seen its net profit drop by some 33 percent for the first quarter of the year ended March 31, 2017.Namely, the company ended the quarter with a net profit of QAR 236 million (USD 64.8 million), significantly lower than QAR 352 million (USD 96.6 million) reported in the same period in 2016.Milaha’s operating revenues also decreased to QAR 648 million for the first three months of the year, compared to QAR 767 million reached a year earlier, representing a decrease of 15 percent, while its operating profit dropped by 27 percent to QAR 185 million from QAR 256 million in the respective periods.“We are continuing to face the same market challenges as in 2016, but we remain confident in our ability to drive growth and capitalize on new opportunities while exercising financial discipline,” H.E. Sheikh Ali bin Jassim Al Thani, Chairman of Milaha’s Board of Directors, said.Additionally, Milaha Maritime & Logistics’ net profit declined by QAR 14 million, mainly as a result of continued rate pressure in the company’s container shipping unit, while Milaha Gas & Petrochem’s net profit plunged by QAR 46 million mainly driven by a global downturn in shipping rates that impacted all major sectors.Similarly, Milaha Offshore reported a drop in its profit as well, which decreased by QAR 25 million, with QAR 22 million of that related to impairments.“Given the difficult environment we are working in, we posted solid operational results. We will continue moving ahead with our multi-year growth strategy to build a stronger and more sustainable business,” Abdulrahman Essa Al-Mannai, Milaha’s President and CEO, said.last_img read more

Morgan Freeman Joins Stand Up To Cancer And Genentech In New PSA

first_imgStand Up To Cancer (SU2C) and Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, have collaborated on a new public service announcement (PSA) featuring Academy Award-winning actor and SU2C Ambassador Morgan Freeman, who also is an executive producer of The C Word, a powerful new cancer documentary.Video: :60 TV PSA – SUC2-Be The Breakthrough – Morgan FreemanThe PSA is part of a collaboration between SU2C and Genentech called Be The Breakthrough, a multi-faceted effort that celebrates the people behind progress in cancer: the patients who participate in clinical trials, the scientists and doctors who make medical advances and improve care, and the people who provide support to those living with cancer.While we have made significant progress, there is much left to do to fight cancer. The disease still affects 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women in the U.S. in their lifetime. The Be The Breakthrough PSA is designed to increase awareness of and educate about the critical importance of individual contributions, such as getting screened regularly and participating in clinical trials, to continue advancing progress against cancer.“I am honored to join Stand Up To Cancer and Genentech in this extremely important PSA campaign,” said Academy Award-winning actor Freeman. “As the executive producer of The C Word documentary, it’s important to me to help raise awareness of this disease and the progress being made. I hope through this PSA and also through The C Word that I can help change the way people view cancer.”The PSA will begin airing December 2016 and encourages the public to visit SU2C.org/breakthrough. The website will provide resources and tools for people who want to learn about screening tests and clinical trials that may be right for them.Freeman adds: “Even the smallest steps against cancer are breakthroughs and can lead to something extraordinary. Getting screened, participating in a clinical trial, caring for patients, teaching prevention or pursuing an uncharted area of research — these are all breakthroughs. Defeating cancer takes breakthroughs, and together we can all be the breakthrough.”In the PSA, Freeman, standing on a dramatically lit stage alongside cancer survivor Tonya Peat, delivers an inspiring and poetic monologue about what it means to “be the breakthrough.” Tonya represents all the brave survivors who fight tirelessly.The PSA was developed by the Creative Direction team of Nate Naylor and Chris Maiorino, and produced by the teams at Blacklist and Tendril, and Executive Produced by Madeline Marotto.In addition to Be The Breakthrough, Genentech is also a collaborator in Catalyst, a program that will use funding and materials from the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostic and medical devices industries to accelerate research on cancer prevention, detection and treatment.“We are grateful to Genentech for their continued dedication to Stand Up To Cancer’s research and their commitment to discovering science breakthroughs to help saves lives,” said Stand Up To Cancer Co-Founder Lisa Paulsen. “We are also grateful to Morgan Freeman for lending his voice to this campaign. His dedication to raising awareness for this disease through his participation in this PSA and through his documentary The C Word, makes him such a powerful ambassador.”“SU2C has made great progress against cancer by combining awareness, public education and cutting-edge research, which is why we’ve deepened our collaboration with them to include ‘Be The Breakthrough,’” said Troy Cox, Senior Vice President of BioOncology at Genentech. “We are excited to have Morgan Freeman bring his voice and advocacy to this public health initiative that empowers everyone to play a role in the fight against cancer.”last_img read more

Ottawas mishandling of Jordans Principle means gaps delays and denials for First

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsThe Canadian Human Rights Tribunal has ordered for the full implementation of Jordan’s Principle to ensure equal healthcare for Indigenous children in a decision released Tuesday.The order was part of the long-awaited ruling released Tuesday that detailed how Canada discriminates against Indigenous people in its policies and funding of child welfare on-reserve.The goal of Jordan’s Principle is to ensure Indigenous children on-reserve have equal access to healthcare.“(Indigenous Affairs) is also ordered to cease applying its narrow definition of Jordan’s Principle and to take measures to immediately implement the full meaning and scope of Jordan’s principle,” the tribunal said in its 182-page. “More than just funding, there is a need to refocus the policy of the program to respect human rights principles and sound social work practice.”Who pays for health services on-reserve – the province, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, or Health Canada – can be complicated. Jordan’s Principle dictates care for the child first and fight over who pays later.Despite the House of Commons unanimously adopting Jordan’s Principle in 2007, Indigenous Affairs went on to define the principle so narrowly, that it said no cases existed.‎The human rights tribunal didn’t agree.“Such an approach defeats the purpose of Jordan’s Principle and results in service gaps, delays and denials for First Nations children on reserve,” the decision said.Jordan’s Principle is named after Jordan River Anderson, a young boy with severe special needs from Manitoba’s remote Norway House Cree Nation. He died in hospital while the province and federal government fought over his care. He never got to see his home.Ottawa came up with a complicated definition. It only applied the principle to situations in which there was a dispute between the federal government and the province over who should pay for a service needed by a child on-reserve with multiple disabilities requiring multiple health services.“It is Health Canada’s and AANDC’s narrow interpretation of Jordan’s Principle that results in there being no cases meeting the criteria for Jordan’s Principle,” the tribunal ruled. “Jordan’s Principle is meant to apply to all First Nations children. There are many other First Nations children without multiple disabilities who require services, including child and family services. Having to put a child in care in order to access those services, when those services are available to all other Canadians is one of the main reasons this Complaint was made.”Tribunal panel members heard hundreds of hours of testimony over 76 days of hearings. Thousands of documents were submitted in a fight that began in 2007 when Cindy Blackstock, a First Nations’ child welfare advocate along with Assembly of First Nations, filed a human rights complaint.The panel found Canada’s position “unreasonable, unconvincing and not supported by the preponderance of evidence in this case.”In an interview last December, Blackstock said documents show a federal bureaucracy working to protect politicians over the needs of Indigenous children.“It’s very clear to me they completely didn’t get it,” Blackstock said at the time. “Or even if they did get it, they felt the moral course was to deny children services and I think that’s unconscionable. There shouldn’t be more red tape for them to jump, there shouldn’t be longer waits. They shouldn’t be denied services because they’re First Nations’ children.”Three years ago, Mi’kmaw woman Maurina Beadle, took the federal government to court for not providing equal healthcare services for her son Jeremy Meawasige, who has special needs.When Beadle had a stroke in 2010, her band the Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia, picked up the tab for Jeremy’s extra home care. But argued that it was a cost Ottawa should cover. And not doing so made it a case of Jordan’s Principle.The courts agreed. Beadle won her case.A year later, Ottawa appealed. And an internal federal document puts that decision squarely at the feet of then Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, who was defeated in October’s election.“Minister Valcourt, the federal lead for Jordan’s Principle, decided to have the Crown appeal the decision on May 6, 2013, on the principle that the Judge erred in his interpretation of JP,” noted a memo labelled “secret.”Ottawa had consistently argued no cases of Jordan’s Principle existed.Emails between federal officials at Health Canada paint a different picture.“There will likely be more cases coming forward so we will definitely need a good tracking system,” the documents said.Blackstock pointed to a April 15, 2013 document, which summarizes a call between officials with Health Canada and Aboriginal and Northern Affairs discussing how to narrow the impact of Beadle’s court victory.The memo detailed how two bureaucrats decided the Pictou Landing case “will be labelled as a JP case, that way it can be treated as an isolated case and the interim remedy can be limited to this case alone.”Blackstock said that document showed how the Harper government saw Jordan’s Principle as a way of limiting the services for kids.A lot has changed since these emails and briefing notes were volleyed back and forth between bureaucrats. The Liberals now form a majority government.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has issued its report. Recommendation Number 3: “We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.”In its decision, the tribunal left the remedies – how government should fix this problem – for a later date. Reaction from the Liberal Government is still to come.Blackstock and the Assembly of First Nations will hold a press conference later Tuesday.Back in December, when Blackstock still had her fingers crossed over the tribunal decision, she said whatever changes happen, it’s not just about more money for child welfare and health services for First Nations.“The bureaucracy is still in place,” said Blackstock. “And their particular goal appears to be to have protected the minister and they didn’t make the effort to really ensure that children were the focal point of benefitting from federal services. I’m hoping we see that change.For Blackstock, it’s a matter of making sure that memo makes it through the red tape.“I’m hoping the federal government immediately instructs the bureaucrats to make sure these changes reach down into the levels of kids,” she [email protected]last_img read more

Projects honouring MMIWG gets 13M in federal funding

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsThe federal government is committing $13 million to fund more than 100 projects commemorating the lives of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada.“The point of this commemoration fund is to ensure that the stories of our stolen sisters are put in their rightful place in Canada’s history,” said Women and Gender Equality Minister Maryam Monsef at an announcement in Winnipeg Monday.Monsef added the projects will also help toward healing for families.Money for the fund comes after the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls called on the government to create a commemoration fund in its interim report released in 2017.In total, 105 projects were approved by an external indigenous review committee said Monsef.Those projects include art installations and exhibits, productions such as movies and operas, as well as creating safe spaces for women.Communities were tasked with submitting proposals outlining the project and costs.When it came to proposals Monsef says there was only one condition.“Families are at the heart of this… commemorations had to have a letter of support from families,” she said.One of those family members is Angela Lavallee.Lavallee testified at the Vancouver hearings about her nine-month-old granddaughter who died in 2015.Lavallee says a coroner concluded the cause of death undetermined but the family doesn’t accept this conclusion.She teamed up with Manitoba Moon Voices, a grassroots organization in Manitoba, to propose a structure that will sit on Winnipeg’s frozen Red River in the winter.The structure will be apart of a series of warming huts designed to act as a shelter along the city’s popular Red River skating trail.It will be in the shape of a woman and will act as an educational tool for people passing by.“We want to be able to draw in community outside of our own community so we want her to sit on the river,” said Lavallee. “Just resilient. Kind of like the symbolization of Indigenous women themselves.”In the summer Lavallee hopes the structure can rest on a piece of land at The Forks.The Manitoba Inuit Association put forth a proposal for The Red Amautiit Project, which will see a team from the organization travel to communities in Nunavut and northern Labrador to work with locals on a traditional sewing project.The amautiit or amaut (singular) is a traditional Inuit women’s parka designed with a large pouch in the back where mothers carry their children.“It symbolizes women and girls and as we know the red dress is the commemorative symbol for MMIWG,” said Rachel Dutton, executive director of the Manitoba Inuit Association.“Inuit really want to create that space for their stories and experiences.”Dutton says The Red Amautiit Project will open up the space for Inuit women to share their traditional teachings.She hopes to see it become either a traveling exhibit or placed as a permanent exhibit in a museum in the future.Projects will be rolled out over the next two [email protected]@bhobs22last_img read more

A New Learning Center Opened At The Oseta Jolly Primary School

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Caribbean Food and Wine Festival goes to Gourmet Safari Providenciales, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014 – An over one hundred thousand dollar investment, and scores of hours in volunteerism by the Amanyara staff. QUOTES. The Amanyara Resort has gallantly come to the aide of the 500 students and their teachers at the Blue Hills based primary school; another private partner on board to support the government school system. Marco Franck, General Manager of Amanyara said they tried to combine a traditional library type setting with a new age feel including computers and soft reading through e-books. School principal Rachel Handfield said the addition is called the Peaceful Place Learning Center. QUOTE. Amanyara will also resurface the kindergarten’s playground as among its projects for Oseta Jolly in this new school year. Also on hand: the Education Minister, the Official Opposition Leader and PTA President Blossom Simons. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Resort Security catches illegals on speed boatcenter_img Related Items:amanyara, blossom simons, marco granck, osetta jolly, peaceful place learning center, rachel handfield Recommended for you RBC & AND Construction make Oseta Jolly playground like newlast_img read more