Legal Roundup

first_img Legal RoundupAbel Band University: Abel Band in Sarasota has launched a new firm-wide education, development, and knowledge management program. Known as Abel Band University, the program operates as the firm’s conduit for continuing education and development programs for both attorneys and nonattorneys. The university’s primary purpose is to enhance business and legal skills so that all staff and attorneys are better educated to deliver the highest level of client service possible. The university provides educational opportunities utilizing technology and other media that enable lawyers to participate in programs within the office to minimize time away from delivering client service, while still allowing attorneys to obtain the latest and most up-to-date educational materials. Sandler Wins McEwen Award: Hillsborough County Bar’s immediate past president, William J. Schifino, Jr., presented Susan Sandler with the Red McEwen Award, given by the outgoing president to the individual who provided the most assistance during his or her term. Sandler was recognized in part for her “tireless efforts” for Lawyers for Literacy, elementary school children’s mentoring, and the West Tampa Elementary School projects and her contributions to the community and the legal profession. Sandler is a staff attorney with Bay Area Legal Services Stetson Wins: A team of students from Stetson University College of Law won the 15th Annual Cathy Bennett National Criminal Trial Competition at the annual meeting of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers in Santa Fe, N.M. The Stetson student team of Patricia Calhoun, Samuel Denny, Reneka Redmond, and Ruel Smith beat a student team from the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law in the final round of the three-day competition to become national champions. Teams argued a hypothetical death penalty case. This is the first year a capital litigation problem was used in the competition. Rogers Towers Honored: Jacksonville Area Legal Aid presented Rogers Towers with its 2005 Equal Justice Award and Chief Justice Barbara Pariente was the keynote speaker at the awards reception. “For 100 years Rogers Towers has been a part of our local community,” said Michael Figgins, executive director of Jacksonville Area Legal Aid. “JALA is honored to be recognized by RT during its special anniversary with an expression of generosity that honors the entire legal profession and furthers JALA’s commitment to justice for all.” In August, JALA approached Rogers Towers for fundraising help to replace funds which were budgeted by JALA, but unexpectedly cut by governmental sources. In response to this need, the firm created a program to match individual financial contributions made by its attorneys. Gables Bar sets Holiday Luncheon: The Coral Gables Bar Association will hold its holiday luncheon December 21 from 11: 30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Norman’s located at 21 Almeria Ave in Coral Gables. The cost is $55 per person, with part of the proceeds going to CHARLEE — Children Have All Rights: Legal, Educational, Emotional — an organization that provides therapeutic, residential, and support services to abused and neglected children in Miami-Dade County. For more information contact Deborah A. Antoni, Coral Gables Bar director, at [email protected] Martin County Softball: The Young Lawyers Division of the Martin County Bar hosted the Second Annual Martin County Bench, Bar, and Red Cross Youth Leadership Program Softball Game. Jack Sobel and Robert Naberhaus pitched for the two teams; Walter Woods coached from the bench. Chief Judge Roby brought his son who was a star hitter, and his daughter who helped out in the outfield. Others who participated include: Judge Lawrence Mirman, Richard Levenstein, Scott Konopka, Rep. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, R.J. Ferraro, Todd Thurlow, and Darren Steele. Nina Ferraro, and Michelle Naberhaus cheered from the sidelines. Jennifer Waters photographed the event. Marland, Passidomo Recognized: The Collier County Women’s Bar Association recently presented its “Distinguished Executive Award” to Martha Marland of Northern Trust Bank and Trust Company for leading in the “workplace with vision, determination, and compassion, and for promoting and creating a good working environment for women attorneys within her organization.” The “Woman Lawyer of the Year Award” was presented to Kathleen Passidomo for “excelling in her career, overcoming traditional stereotypes associated with women, and distinguishing herself as an outstanding practitioner of law.” Carbo and Dr. Phil: In a recent appearance on the “Dr. Phil Show,” Ft. Lauderdale attorney Michael J. Carbo demonstrated how effective mediation can resolve a highly complex child custody case. Carbo, a certified family mediator, was invited to appear on the program to help settle a bitterly fought custody case involving alternative lifestyles. The case involved a woman who became a man through a sex change operation in 1987. Two years later, he married a woman who was pregnant at the time. Then the couple had another child by artificial insemination. When the wife filed for divorce and primary residence of the children, ages 15 and 13, the case drew national attention and the two-week trial was televised on Court TV – without coming to a resolution. Carbo held a successful seven-hour mediation session in May, and then flew to Los Angeles two days later to appear on the Dr. Phil Show. Burnett to Lead Bankruptcy Lawyers: At a recent meeting of the Southwest Florida Bankruptcy Professional Association, the following officers were elected: Philip L. Burnett, president; Louis Amato, vice president; Richard A. Johnston, Jr., secretary; Gregory Champeau, treasurer. Legal Roundup December 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

Britain’s APD response ‘a slap in the face’ for Caribbean

first_img 23 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! NewsRegional Britain’s APD response ‘a slap in the face’ for Caribbean by: – December 7, 2011 Share St Kitts and Nevis Minister of Tourism and International Transportation Ricky Skerritt making a statement in the St Kitts and Nevis National assembly on Tuesday afternoon. (Photo by Erasmus Williams)BASSETERRE, St Kitts — The British government’s announcement on Tuesday that it will continue to discriminate against the Caribbean in relation to the banding aspect of the Air Passenger Duty (APD) system, has been described as “a slap in the face for all Caribbean people.”In a 26-page document published on Tuesday, the British government said that APD rates to Caribbean destinations will continue to be considerably higher than those to some competitor destinations. Furthermore, the fact that premium economy passengers will continue to be charged the same APD as first class passengers is a blow for those customers wanting to upgradeOver a period of three years, the Caribbean and its community in the UK have consistently sought to raise the issue of APD at all levels of the British government and with the UK parliament. St Kitts and Nevis Minister of Tourism Ricky Skerritt, chairman of the Caribbean Tourism Organisation (CTO) said: “Today’s announcement on the APD is a slap in the face for all Caribbean people. It dismisses all of the research and information CTO has provided to the British government over the past three years, and it contradicts the message sent by the UK Chancellor, George Osborne MP, in March 2011 when he cited the discrepancy between the USA and Caribbean APD rates as one of the reasons for holding a consultation on reform of UK APD. The Caribbean is the most tourism-dependent region of the world and the British government’s decision totally ignores the negative effect that APD is having on our economies and the Caribbean’s business partners in the UK travel industry.”“It is a slap in the face of Caribbean people because at no point in recent months has the Caribbean being led to believe that its concerns would not be addressed. As recently as the second week in November I sat face to face with a senior Minister in the United Kingdom Treasury who reassured me that the British government was sensitive to our concerns and would be announcing shortly a decision that would have addressed the issue of parity,” Skerritt continued.“I say it is a slap in the face because the UK government’s announcement in effect says it will continue to discriminate against the Caribbean. It says that APD rates to the Caribbean will be continue to be considerably higher than some competitor destinations,” he said.“It is slap in the face because the Caribbean is the most tourism dependent region in the world and the British government decision totally ignores the negative effect that it is having on our economy,” Skerritt added.Caribbean prime ministers, ministers of tourism, the Caribbean Tourism Organization, the Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association and the Caribbean Diaspora in the UK, including the High Commissioners, have consistently raised the issue of Air Passenger Duty with the UK government and UK Parliament and the region’s concern about the negative effect that APD is having on the tourism dependent economies of the Caribbean and on the Caribbean community living in the United Kingdom.The region made a formal response to the Air Passenger Duty consultation in June. In summary this made clear that: • The Caribbean requires parity in banding with the US.• A move to a two band system would address the Caribbean’s requirement if this resulted in equal treatment of all long haul destinations. • No other option set out in the consultation addresses the concerns of the Caribbean.• APD has become a political issue with the Caribbean Diaspora in the UK. Skerrit said it is a matter that Caribbean governments would have to raise in the near future with the United Kingdom and hoped the issue would again be raised at the upcoming United Kingdom-Caribbean Forum in mid-January 2012 in Grenada.He said it is a time for the Caribbean to speak out and let the British Government know that we are not happy.“It is a time for Caribbean leaders at all levels to understand that this is about a serious economic matter and this matter will not go away just by wishing it away,” said Skerritt.By Caribbean News Now contributorcenter_img Share Share Tweetlast_img read more

QPR ‘to improve bids’ for duo

first_imgNeil Warnock reflects on his recent sacking as QPR manager in his weekly column in The Independent.“I just don’t fit in with the mould of a Premier League manager. I treat the club’s money as if it were my own and I resent paying over the odds,” he says.Safe or not?The Daily Star report that QPR are losing their battle to sign new players in time for Sunday’s game at Newcastle – and that new manager Mark Hughes has been told his job will be safe even if Rangers are relegated.The Guardian, on the other hand, report that Hughes’ job will not be safe if Rangers go down.The Daily Mail say QPR plan to table improved offers for Chelsea defender Alex and Tottenham midfielder Steven Pienaar after failing with their initial bids.And a number of papers claim Hughes was furious about Martin Jol’s recent comments about him.Related story: Fulham boss shrugs off Hughes claim (12 January)Meanwhile, Sunderland are keen to sign Fulham striker Bobby Zamora, according to the Daily Mirror.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

South Africa, Spain sign arts, culture pact

first_img18 April 2012 King Juan Carlos of Spain wants to see more South African music, films and crafts in his country, Spanish ambassador Benavides Orgaz told Arts and Culture Minister Paul Mashatile on Tuesday. Speaking at the signing of a cultural agreement between the two countries in Pretoria, Orgaz said that forging closer cultural ties with a country with an such an important historical background was “a luxury, hence we are saying bring more South African music, crafts and films to our country.” Mashatile said in response that his department would consider establishing an annual South African Week in Spain, during which local artists would perform at various events around the country. The cultural agreement, he said, would go a long way towards strengthening people-to-people contact between South Africa and Spain. “As we have said on various occasions, people-to-people contact is one of the key instruments to promote greater understanding and appreciation of one another. “People-to-people contact is also the key that opens other doors of interaction, be it in the fields of trade and commerce, education, technology exchanges and many other strategic areas.” The agreement would also open new avenues for cooperation in the areas of publishing, heritage preservation and museums, music, theatre, dance and film, Mashatile said. The minister thanked the Spanish government for placing relations with the African continent high on its agenda. “We are encouraged by the work done by the Spanish government to support the African World Heritage Fund,” he said. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Paul Graham: Priority Access to Twitter Is Practical Necessity

first_imgIf hardcore hackers had any doubts whether the real-time web was a legitimate development environment, Y Combinator co-founder Paul Graham is dispelling them. In an interview with Graham, ReadWriteWeb learned that the entrepreneur-turned-investor issued a “Request for Startups” (RFS) asking for ideas from companies utilizing Twitter and Justin.tv’s live video API. Groups who are accepted to Y-Combinator and fall under these categories will be given “priority access” to Twitter and Justin.tv. Says Graham, “In the beginning people believed Twitter was a fad and they didn’t realize this was a new protocol…In some ways Twitter is a replacement for email. We’re not doing this to promote Twitter, we genuinely believe it’s important.” It’s obvious why Y Combinator companies are able to gain special support from Justin.tv’s founders. The lifecasting site took on Y Combinator seed funding in 2007 and has since developed into one of the web’s leading online video destinations. The Twitter partnership is a different story. While it’s important that Y Combinator teams have Twitter’s support, the question on many people’s minds is, “If Twitter is an all-important protocol, then why should one group of investors get privileged access to its data-rich firehose?”According to Graham, “This is a practical matter. They need to be able to keep ahead of growth technically… If thousands of startups want to talk to you, then you need to have filters. Even before publishing this Request for Startups, we had a dedicated guy at Twitter who answered Y Combinator questions.” In the past, Y Combinator-funded real-time meta-search engine Scoopler worked closely with Twitter. Said Graham, “Honestly, Twitter probably has a lot of filters on those who access them. The only thing special about this is that we formalized it with an RFS.” After taking a $2 million dollar investment from Sequoia Capital in March, Y Combinator aims to increase its portfolio companies from 40 to roughly 60 per year. The “Request for Startups” offers companies direction in their applications. Graham notes that when individuals apply for Y Combinator, they are asked to specify if they are applying with an RFS in mind. While he estimates that only 10% of applications are directly related to the RFS, he believes that many who might not apply are inspired to do so after seeing their ideas highlighted. The incubator’s first requests were issued in August with a call for alternative journalism and online retail ideas. Tags:#Interviews#start#startups dana oshiro Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

Repairs Being Monitored at Ward Theatre to Maintain Heritage Value

first_imgStory Highlights Speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) ‘Think Tank’ on May 24, Acting Executive Director of the JNHT, Dorrick Gray, said a preservationist architect has been working with the Kingston and St. Andrew Municipal Corporation (KSAMC) to ensure that guidelines are followed and repairs “fit into the overall structure of the building.” The Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT) is monitoring repairs at the Ward Theatre to ensure that its heritage value is maintained.Renovation work is ongoing at the theatre, a historical landmark situated on North Parade in downtown Kingston.Speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) ‘Think Tank’ on May 24, Acting Executive Director of the JNHT, Dorrick Gray, said a preservationist architect has been working with the Kingston and St. Andrew Municipal Corporation (KSAMC) to ensure that guidelines are followed and repairs “fit into the overall structure of the building.”He pointed out that any changes to the building will have to be approved by the JNHT, although the building is managed by the KSAMC.“It is a declared monument and we are interested in ensuring that the integrity of that building is maintained,” he added.As it relates to what areas of the building will be maintained, Mr. Gray said the structure is being assessed, after which the details will be discussed with the KSAMC.However, he noted that several areas are made of wood and they have insects and termites.“So, a lot of those will have to be replaced. But it is a work in progress,” Mr. Gray said.Highlighting the importance of the building, he argued that it represents “the local art of us as a people and the birth of the annual Pantomime.”Mr. Gray said the Ward Theatre, donated to the City of Kingston by Colonel C.J. Ward in 1912, is the last of four structures to have been constructed on the same site.He noted that the first one was built in 1770.“The last one before this theatre was built was destroyed by the 1907 earthquake,” he added.The Ward Theatre, which was declared a national monument in January 2000, is among some 300 sites declared as protected heritage by the JNHT.center_img The Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT) is monitoring repairs at the Ward Theatre to ensure that its heritage value is maintained.last_img read more