SDK to license vinyl acetate monomer technology to Shenghong Refining Petrochemical, China

first_imgShowa Denko will license its technology of producing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) to Shenghong Refining Petrochemical Image: SDK to license VAM technology to Shenghong Refining Petrochemical. Photo: Courtesy of James Glen/Pixabay Showa Denko (SDK) has decided to license its technology to produce vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) to Shenghong Refining Petrochemical (Lian Yun Gang) Co., Ltd., China, under a formal alliance agreement between SDK and KBR, a global engineering and technology solutions company based in the US. In addition, SDK will provide catalysts for the VAM production facility to be constructed by Shenghong Refining Petrochemical Co., Ltd. (SRP).SDK has been producing VAM from ethylene at its Oita Petrochemical Complex for 40 years, and has polished high-level technologies including that to develop catalysts. SDK formed an alliance with KBR in 2015, and since then, the two parties have been investigating possibilities to operate business to license SDK’s technologies to produce organic chemicals. As a result, SRP decided to adopt SDK’s technologies to produce VAM. The new VAM unit to be constructed in the premise of SRP is expected to have a capacity to produce 300,000 tons of VAM per year.The Showa Denko Group has a vision of becoming a corporate group of Koseiha businesses (individualized businesses), which can maintain high levels of profitability and stability in each business sector, and aims to make more than half of its business sectors Koseiha businesses by 2025. In its Petrochemicals segment, which operates organic chemicals business including VAM production, the Group has been making effort to strengthen its business character in order to maintain high profitability which is resistant to market fluctuation. Toward the future, SDK will continue aiming to make its petrochemicals business the most competitive one in East Asia by enhancing competitiveness of Oita Petrochemical Complex through commercialization of new derivatives and expanding its licensing business. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

Watching for signs of drugs

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – High on drugs, 16-year-old Kyle Salo-Jordan was sure that a car had hit him when he crossed the street, and he thought he was going to die. He grabbed his legs and headed home when another vision appeared: He was an angel and had to watch over his family. The shaggy-haired teen, who had been clean of marijuana for a year, had started using again. This time it was with harder drugs than those he had used in junior high. This time it was with cocaine, crystal meth and Vicodin. And then the hallucinations began. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals But it was during this bad trip, an imaginary near-death experience and heavenly sighting, that the teen had a moment of clarity: He had to stop using. He’s been in recovery for about 35 days now. Each year, thousands like Salo-Jordan smoke, snort and drink their way into addiction, hiding their habits from Mom and Dad, carving out secret lives for themselves and lying their way to keep them. One night last week, a panel of teens in recovery – along with their parents – shared their gritty stories about how their lives spiraled out of control and how they got them back again. They spoke to about 120 parents at Valencia’s Rio Norte Junior High, a meeting quickly set up after a recent school assembly on drugs where nearly each of the 1,250 students in attendance said he or she knew someone who had tried them. “That scared me,” said Cary Quashen, founder of Action, a Santa Clarita-based nonprofit parent and teen support group, who led the school assembly. “I’d never seen anything like that. And I’ve been doing this for more than 10 years.” Quashen, a recovering drug addict and counselor, said that when he asked the seventh- and eighth-grade students that day who in the crowd wouldn’t try drugs, not all their hands went up. Some kids may experiment with drugs before they become teens, so Quashen urges parents to talk to their children by the time they reach middle school in order to head off problems. Although there are signs of drug use – mood swings, lies, failing grades – not all symptoms are obvious and parents have to look harder for clues, according to Mary Jordan, Kyle’s mother. Because her son’s report card was good and he was friendly with his siblings, she thought his dark days from junior high were over. But when her son asked to return to a teen support group, something he scoffed at before, she knew he was back on drugs. The teen did return to the group and also went through an outpatient drug program. He said life has been getting better ever since. And now random drug testing is part of everyday life in their house, for all their children after completing sixth grade. Jordan and other parents on the panel urged the audience to go through their sons’ and daughters’ back packs if they’re suspicious, to look past the “you don’t trust me” cries from their children, to follow their guts. “Sometimes you have to be the bad guy,” she said. “You can be a good parent by being responsible.” Quashen said random drug testing at home also gives kids another reason to reject drugs and provides an excuse to tell their peers why they can’t take them. But there are still drugs that slip through the cracks and aren’t detected by drug dogs in school, such as medications used for attention deficit and hyperactive disorders. Some students taking medications for those disorders also sell them to others, Jordan said, and nobody’s monitoring the problem. Even strong concentrations of ibuprofen can provide a high. It was the over-the-counter medication Coricidin that landed Kari Suarez, 16, in the hospital two years ago after she swallowed 61 pills. Her pulse raced at 190 beats per minute as she lay on a hospital bed, barely conscious. An hour later, it dropped to 180. Her mother, Lori Diacri, watched each breath her daughter took, wondering if she was going to die of a heart attack. At the time, Suarez had been grounded. Drug dogs had come through her summer school class and found marijuana on her. Suarez said she was arrested on a charge of possession. Later, she shoplifted Coricidin Cough & Cold, also known as triple C. “The high doesn’t smell like pot; it doesn’t smell like alcohol,” said Diacri, who had attended an assembly on teen drug use a week before her daughter overdosed. “I knew we had a problem, but I had no idea what we were dealing with.” Suarez survived. After that day, she went to an outpatient care program, enrolled in Quashen’s program and started going to Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous meetings. She has been sober for two years and one month. After hearing a few stories of survival, some parents somberly rose from their seats and asked the teenagers questions: How can I keep my children off drugs? Why you? Why did you get into drugs? For Kyle Salo-Jordan, it was to dull the pain of his shattered self-esteem that, day after day, had taken a beating from people at school who tormented him for the clothes he wore and called him names. He said he felt ripped to shreds. “The only thing that made me feel better was drugs,” he said. After the meeting, Lisa McMartin, a parent in the audience, wished she had heard the presentation a long time ago, because she would have recognized her 16-year-old son’s drug problem earlier. She saw his rage, knew he was sleeping a lot and said he was constantly taking private calls on his cell phone. Her son, she said, was getting deep into drugs. But now he’s getting help. With tears pouring down her face, the Canyon Country mother said all parents should attend these seminars to educate themselves about drugs. Her son, she said, had taken drugs for two years. “If we would have come to this a lot sooner, we would have recognized the symptoms,” she said. Sue Doyle, (661) 257-5254 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more