Turks and Caicos airline ICA now flies to Havana

first_img Recommended for you At Least 10 People Killed in Cuba from Hurricane Irma Cuban military crash leaves 8 dead Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 22 Feb 2016 – InterCaribbean Airways continues to fulfill its vision to connect the northern Caribbean and last week announced that it will begin flying into Cuba; making the move into the communist Caribbean country faster than any other airline. Trevor Sadler, CEO said the flights will begin in May to Havana, Cuba. The flights will be Tuesdays and Thursdays at 4:30pm and returning to Provo from Havana, which is one of the leading destinations within Cuba, on Wednesdays and Fridays at 8:10am. Lyndon R. Gardiner, Chairman of interCaribbean Airways in targeting visitors to the TCI said: “With the USA easing entry to Cuba, we look forward to welcoming aboard those who wish to enjoy two destination trips, and increase trade and travel between our Caribbean Countries.” InterCaribbean airways currently flies to 12 destinations in the Caribbean. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:cuba, havana, Intercaribbean Airways, lyndon gardiner Airports Authority commanded to protect South Caicos airport by airlinelast_img read more

Chatbot autotweets replies to climate change arguments

first_img Nigel Leck’s creation is @AI_AGW (also known as Turing Test), and the script searches the Twitter site for hundreds of phrases he believes tend to be used by those who think global warming is not occurring, or who think it is occurring but is not anthropogenic or entirely anthropogenic. When the script finds one of the phrases it then “tweets” a response from an extensive database of countering phrases.The return tweets are selected to match the phrases found so, for example, tweets about global warming occurring on Mars or Neptune will produce a response suggesting this does not prove the sun is warming and producing Earth’s global warming. Tweets often contain a link to a scientific source or a video refuting the argument.Leck said he originally wrote many of the rebuttals himself, but he has now extracted many from a university source, but one which he will not identify. Some of the responses relate to religion, which is where Leck says debates with the chatbot often end up.The tweets are not identified as autoresponses, although the name provides clues, and Leck said many people receiving them continue their “conversations” for hours or days, which is possible because the program selects from a range of responses and does not reply the same way each time.Leck said if the program “argues them into a corner,” there tends to be two “crowds”: one who resort to the “God created it that way” final response, and a second group Leck calls “skeptics so unyielding they won’t be swayed by any amount of argumentation.”One problem with the chatbot is its inability to spot sarcasm, which is often rife during extreme weather events such as heat waves, when many tweets suggest it’s so hot outside it’s “a good thing global warming is a myth,” or cold snaps, when tweets sarcastically suggest global warming is a hoax. Leck said the program includes an algorithm that enables it to learn to recognize such false positives, but that he promptly apologizes when the chatbot is found to have irritated Twitter users who are not arguing about climate change, and whitelists their accounts. Leck said he intends to expand the program at some time by enabling it to cull new phrases from tweets from others (presumably also non-scientists like Leck) debating with those skeptical of climate change arguments. He said this would allow it to argue “into the ground” the increasing number of what he called “anti-science tweeters who are unwilling or unable to look up the proper scientific literature themselves.” (PhysOrg.com) — A software developer has created a “chatbot” program for Twitter to automatically detect set phrases associated with arguments put forward by those skeptical of anthropogenic global warming, and to send automated replies of set phrases debunking their arguments. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Chatbot auto-tweets replies to climate change arguments (2010, November 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-chatbot-auto-tweets-climate-arguments.html Using mathematics to identify the good guys  Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

6 things you need to know about Joon Air Frances new airline

first_imgTags: Air France, Low-Cost Carriers Travelweek Group Share Tuesday, September 26, 2017 6 things you need to know about Joon, Air France’s new airlinecenter_img << Previous PostNext Post >> Posted by PARIS — Air France has launched a brand new airline designed to meet the needs of a new generation of travellers. Bearing the hip and happy-sounding moniker Joon, the airline will toe the line between a “traditional and low-cost airline”, said Franck Terner, CEO of Air France.“Joon is one of our major projects as part of the strategic plan Trust Together, and will be one of Air France’s priorities in its offensive to win back market share,” he said.Jean-Michel Mathieu, CEO of Joon, added: “Joon is Air France’s little sister who breaks with tradition and takes inspiration from the new expectations of travellers to offer an experience that goes beyond the aircraft doors.”Starting Dec. 1 in Europe, with prices starting from €39 including tax, are: Barcelona (51 weekly flights); Berlin (37 weekly flights); Lisbon (28 weekly flights); and Porto (three weekly flights).Starting in Summer 2018 in Brazil and the Seychelles are: Fortaleza, Brazil, starting at €249 including tax with two weekly flights; and Mahé, Seychelles, starting at €299 including tax with three weekly flights.More news:  Hotel charges Bollywood star $8.50 for two bananas and the Internet has thoughtsHere are 6 things you need to know about Joon:1. Foodies will love itThere’ll be a free catering offer in Business and a new paid option in Economy. There’ll be around 60 tasty treats sold onboard, 20% of which are organic, as well as high-energy fruit juice and free drinks at all times (water, orange juice, organic Segafredo coffee and tea).2. Fliers will never be boredYouJoon will give passengers access to in-flight streaming on their smartphones, tablets of laptops. Once onboard, they’ll be able to connect directly to the Joon login portal and choose from a wide range of programs. In the event batteries die, passengers can recharge them with their individual USB port.3. Joon has lots of friendsThe airline already has a network of innovative partnerships that can also be deployed at Air France. These include TravelCar, which will take care of clients’ vehicles at Paris-CDG while they’re away, Le BHV Marais, which conducts Paris tours, and Waynabox, offering weekend packages from Paris.More news:  GLP Worldwide introduces first-ever Wellness programs4. Joon looks super coolThere’s no way you’ll miss a Joon aircraft in the sky – it’s electric blue! Plus, Joon’s 140 flight attendants all sport classic and modern garments, all of which have been designed with recycled fabrics made from plastic bottles.5. Joon is more tech-savvy than most millennialsThe AlloSky Virtual Reality Headset, available in Business class on long-haul flights, is a new generation headset that provides a high-definition screen and a diopter correction to adapt to eyes. Also, Paper Plane, which will soon be available on flyjoon.com, allows friends and families to raise money in order to send clients on a trip to the destination of their choice.6. Joon has a big sisterJoon benefits from all of Air France’s perks, including easier connections at Paris-CDG, Flying Blue Miles, SkyPriority and Air France assistance.For more details, watch this video:last_img read more