World Cup 2015: Australia 28-13 Fiji

first_imgA full review of Australia’s opening World Cup win over Fiji in Cardiff Australia kicked off their World Cup campaign with a victory over Fiji in Cardiff, but they will be disappointed not to have picked up a bonus point. David Pocock crossed twice in the first half and Sekope Kepu scored early in the second, but then Fiji came back into the game and piled on the pressure in Australia’s half to deny the Wallabies that fourth try.WHAT’S HOTScrum – How nice it was to see an upright contest at the scrums rather than constant collapses and resets. The first scrum set the standard, both sides holding steady and a traditional battle of strength coming to the fore. In fact, referee Glen Jackson called it “outstanding” and the majority of scrums were of a similar quality.Star man: Leone Nakarawa showed his full range of skills against the Wallabies. Photo: Getty ImagesLeone Nakarawa – What a year this guy is having. First he wins the Guinness Pro12 with Glasgow and now he is proving the star of this Fijian team. He’s renowned for his offloads, which maintain attacking momentum, while he is also impressing in terms of turnovers at this World Cup (he made another three in this game after getting four against England on Friday) – and he even stole an Australia lineout on the 5m line.The rolling maul – Given the back-lines these two sides have many will have expected this to be a game of all-out attack, players running from deep and showing off nifty footwork and sharp hands. Instead, it was the driving lineout that proved the attacking weapon of choice in the first half. Fiji went close from a couple of lineouts in the Aussie 22 then the Wallabies launched their own driving mauls, David Pocock touching down twice in the space of five minutes.Weekday crowds – For nigh-on 70,000 people to pile into the Millennium Stadium on a midweek afternoon is testament to the pull of the World Cup.Slide show: Prop Sekope Kepu scores Australia’s third try. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S NOTDiscipline – The penalty counts of both sides will not have pleased either coach. Fiji were penalised 13 times and Australia 12. Okay, a lot of the penalties conceded weren’t in a kickable range, but that sort of ill-discipline will cost them in games going forward.Bad hair – Admittedly we could only see this from high up in the press tribune but it was pointed out by a colleague that assistant referee Leighton Hodges had a rather unusual haircut for an official. Shaved all round the sides with a fair clump on top it looked like the ‘high and tight’ cut favoured by Danny Care. One best left to players.Boo boys – It’s long been a bugbear, and the booing and whistling as Bernard Foley lined up a late penalty tarnished what had been a great atmosphere. It simply has no place in the game.Break man: Ben Volavola bursts through to score Fiji’s only try. Photo: Getty ImagesSTATISTICS13 – The number of offloads made by Fiji compared to two by Australia. Power play: David Pocock drives over for the opening try against Fiji. Photo: Getty Images TAGS: FijiHighlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 90 – The number of metres made by Israel Folau, more than any other player.122 – The number of tackles made by Australia compared to 83 by Fiji.Australia: I Folau; A Ashley-Cooper, T Kuridrani, M Giteau (K Beale 72), R Horne; B Foley (M Toomua 78), W Genia (N Phipps 67); S Sio (J Slipper 56-67), S Moore (capt, T Polota-Nau 67), S Kepu (G Holmes 56), K Douglas (W Skelton 71), R Simmons, S Fardy, M Hooper, D Pocock.Tries (3): Pocock 2, Kepu. Cons: Foley 2. Pens: Foley 3.Yellow card: Kuridrani (73)Fiji: M Talebula; W Nayacalevu (A Tikoirotuma 5), V Goneva, G Lovobalavu, N Nadolo; B Volavola, N Matawalu (N Kenatale 50); C Ma’afu, T Tupati, M Saulo, T Cavubati, L Nakarawa, P Yato (P Ravai 35-40), A Qera (capt), N Talei (M Ravulo 67).Try: Volavola. Con: Nadolo. Pens: Nadolo 2.Yellow card: Ma’afu (30)Referee: Glen Jackson (New Zealand)Man of the Match: David Pocock Attendance: 67,253For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

England’s outside-centre options for South Africa tour

first_img England’s outside-centre options for South Africa tourEddie Jones will be looking to finish his third season at the helm of England with a flourish after suffering a torrid Six Nations campaign, plummeting from first place to fifth in a mere 12 months. For the sake of the players’ confidence, their buy-in to Jones’s methods and the fans continuous support, England need a convincing win in South Africa this June.Jonathan Joseph has been ruled out of the three-Test series because he requires foot surgery, so here we highlight the myriad of outside-centre options available to Jones, what they bring to the table and their chances of featuring against Rassie Erasmus’s Springboks.Ben Te’o Club Worcester Warriors Age 31 England caps 13 Lions caps TwoThe former rugby league man has often been shown favour by Jones for his hard-hitting running lines and physicality in defence. Te’o offers cast-iron punching power and an offloading game developed during his seven-year career in league, but has been shown up for his decision-making and speed in defence at times, and is not getting any younger.Power play: Ben Te’o tests Johnny Sexton’s defence (Getty Images)Elliot DalyClub Wasps Age 25 England caps 18 Lions caps ThreeThe England and Lions wing has all the intelligence, distribution skills and electric pace to succeed in England’s midfield. In addition to his extensive experience at centre during his breakthrough with Wasps, Daly possesses a nuclear warhead in his left boot that can just as easily slot a 60m penalty as pounce on the opportunity to punish his opponents for territorial space left vacant in the backfield.The only issue with starting Daly at 13 is the loss of his proven quality as one of the best wingers on the international scene.Over time: Elliot Daly scores a try against Ireland (Getty Images)Henry SladeClub Exeter Chiefs Age 25 England caps TenSlade brings something very different to Joseph, Te’o and Daly. While the three previous midfield options have searing pace, fancy footwork or brute force, the Chiefs centre is an out-and-out playmaker and uses silky smooth skills to weave through defences or set up team-mates.However, the Chiefs star’s inconsistency at Test level may be held against him.In the pink: Henry Slade leads the attack for Exeter (Getty Images)Alex LozowskiClub Saracens Age 24 England caps FourUtilised primarily at inside-centre by England, Lozowski has proven for Saracens that he has all the attributes of an international-class 13. Speed, playmaking ability, monstrous defence and excellent touches from the boot – skills the 24-year-old has in common with all-time greats like Brian O’Driscoll and Conrad Smith.On the move: Alex Lozowski makes a break for Saracens (Getty Images)Joe Marchant Contenders: Jack Nowell and Elliot Daly could play at 13 for England (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Following the news of Jonathan Joseph’s season-ending foot injury, Ali Stokes assesses the men available to Eddie Jones for the tour of South Africa this summercenter_img Club Harlequins Age 21 England caps UncappedMarchant has suffered extensively in recent years with injury, but is back terrorising defences for Harlequins. Electric pace, footwork to rival any other competitors and the vision developed as a fly-half throughout the age grades makes the 21-year-old a genuine attacking weapon.Similar to Joseph, both in build and playing style, Marchant seems the most fitting replacement if Jones is after a like-for-like substitute.Running man: Joe Marchant on the attack for Harlequins (Getty Images)Manu TuilagiClub Leicester Tigers Age 26 England caps 26 Lions caps One“If Tuilagi was fit…”, a phrase uttered more than any other in history when it comes to England’s midfield. The Samoa-born wrecking ball of a centre is most well known for tormenting the All Blacks in 2012 and 2014. When fit and firing, no player in the world can stand toe-to-toe with Tuilagi’s destructive capability, but he is yet to prove his durability with Leicester.Ups and downs: Manu Tuilagi has struggled with injuries (Getty Images)Jack NowellClub Exeter Chiefs Age 25 England caps 26 caps Lions caps TwoThe England and Lions wing is currently under consideration as a centre by Eddie Jones. With a lack of top-end speed compared to the likes of Daly, Jonny May and Anthony Watson but impressive displays of power and footwork against some of the best in the world, the Cornishman possesses tremendous prospects at outside-centre.Nowell may not be as abrasive as Te’o or Tuilagi, but what he lacks in stopping power he makes up for with tenacity.Work ethic: Jack Nowell tries to evade Scotland tackles (Getty Images)Henry TrinderClub Gloucester Age 29 England caps UncappedThe 29-year-old is the most balanced runner in England and has often featured on the wing under Johan Ackermann this season. If not for a career plagued with injuries, the Gloucester man may have established himself in the England set-up years ago.Fly over: Henry Trinder scores a try for Gloucester (Getty Images)THE VERDICTI believe Joe Marchant is the obvious choice at outside-centre for England. With his playmaking experience as a fly-half and threat ball-in-hand, he offers the best option in both the short and long term. Alex Lozowski should pair up with Marchant in midfield, filling in for Owen Farrell, who deserves an extended rest not enforced by injury. George Ford will continue to work as the architect of England’s attack in the dual playmaking system alongside two centres with devastating strike-running capability and solid track records in defence.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Nick Cummins ‘The Bachelor’ Series Up And Running In Australia

first_imgThe ‘Honey Badger’ will be the Bachelor for season six of the TV series in Australia. Cummins’s nickname is the ‘Honey Badger’, a title he gave himself after seeing a documentary on the animal.“I saw the honey badger, and became fascinated,” he said. “It is just so aggressive and will never say die. One of the stories which inspired me is that it is documented that a honey badger killed a male lion in a one-on-one battle.“What happened was that he clawed the canastas off the big fella, going the old one-two. The big fella walked around the corner and fell over. The honey badger got up, shook himself, and just trotted off. For me, that was outstanding.”Because of quotes like the one above, Cummins has become a fan favourite across the globe. In fact the winger has become famous for his funny quotes, and you can watch a selection of the best below. Network Ten executive producer of The Bachelor Australia, Hilary Innes, said: “We are delighted that Nick has agreed to be Australia’s next Bachelor.“He will bring a refreshing, honest and cheeky energy to season six. On top of all his incredible achievements, he is both loveable and surprising. I know he will be a phenomenal Bachelor.”In a statement, Cummins said: “I’m really looking forward to throwing everything at this opportunity to finding the one.“The past ten or so years has been on the road playing rugby or working on my projects, so I’m very excited to be part of a show that is centred around love and good times.” No question, he is going to bring some comedy to the love-related role.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter.center_img Nick Cummins ‘The Bachelor’ Series Up And Running In AustraliaThe 15-Test former Wallaby Nick Cummins has ben announced as The Bachelor in the latest TV-series in Australia.The series is currently in full swing as it started on the 15th of August and there have already been some funny moments including Cummins’ reaction to the first kiss of the series. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

A Q&A with Saracens’ Marlie Packer and Jackson Wray

first_img Chatting away: Marlie Packer and Jackson Wray (pics by Sam Riley) Huddle up: Saracens women in pre-season training (Sam Riley)RW: What about aligning the men’s and women’s teams? There is now more access to staff etc, but what’s it like being under one flag now?MP: It suits the women to have the Saracens identity and to play here at Allianz Park is phenomenal, like using the home changing room. That is different from most teams in the Tyrrells Premiership because week in, week out they won’t get the same facilities. We train here too, which is awesome.It has all come in time. We can say we want more of this and more of that, but we need to let our rugby do the talking. It’s been phenomenal that the men and women have won the Premiership. That’s helped us gain a partnership, helped us get up there for a merger with the men so if we keep doing what we’re doing, playing at the standard we’re playing at, then who knows, in a couple of seasons we might get an off-season (trip) with the boys and show them a thing or two!The gap is closing and they’re supporting us massively.Fans’ favourite: Lock George Kruis poses for photos (Sam Riley)RW: How has Saracens changed over the years?JW: It’s come miles. When I first came here, two generations of coaches ago when Alan Gaffney was here, it was massively different. To be honest, the young guys were nowhere near. Honestly probably as far away as the women have been in the past. That’s how different it was. It didn’t change for a while. Then changes came, bringing everything closer together so it’s a squad of 60 with the academy involved.It’s very, very difficult to not get better if you’ve got people here who are working hard, doing what they do, alongside good coaches. Then we had to evolve and get better again…There’s probably a handful of us still here. That was the start. My age group and Alex Goode just before that; we’re all still here and that is a really important thing in a load of ways as you can make sure the thing carries on. It’s light years away from what it used to be.Answers: Jackson Wray (pics by Sam Riley)MP: I think that’s across the board in the women’s section. There’s a lot of old-timers. Sonia Green has been here for years and years, and I can remember playing her as a wee snapper for Bristol. I think Saracens have definitely got that (thing that makes people stay).I can remember playing for Bristol, looking in at Sarries and thinking, ‘They’ve got something special. They get it all given to them, nice kit etc.’ But when I came here, it’s actually hard work and it’s the players that drive that. People want to play for the club, there’s that desire and it’s not just done on people pushing money.RW: How do you stop things from getting stale?JW: We’ve been working on a lot of new things…RW: Can you share any details?JW: Probably not, no! We’re always thinking of ways to be better. Loads of little things. We’re talking about tactics, techniques, all sorts. There’s not one part of the game that will be the same as last year. We’re trying to take the things that didn’t go as well and make them better in every area. If we weren’t doing that we’d be standing still, which you don’t want to do. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Saracens Women won the Tyrrells Premier 15s last season, while the men’s team clinched the Premiership title. While they had the same name, the women and men had previously operated as separate entities, but this season the two sides have been brought together.We got to see that up close when we visited Allianz Park for a fans’ day recently and you can find out more about that in the new issue of Rugby World magazine, which is out now.We also sat down with back-rowers Marlie Packer and Jackson Wray to get their thoughts on the new season, with the men kicking off against Newcastle this Sunday and the women beginning their season away to Firwood Waterloo on 8 September…Rugby World: What was the key to the women’s Premier 15s success last season?Marlie Packer: I think the strength within the whole squad, not just from one to 23 but all the other players within the set-up. Obviously we lost international players around Six Nations time and some of those games were critical, like we got a draw with Gloucester-Hartpury – that one point we really needed.Together: The back-rowers (Sam Riley)I think our turning point, when we thought we could go the whole way and win it, came pretty late in the season. It was when we played Gloucester-Hartpury away in the semi-final. We won that by a lot of points, but for a lot of the season most of our tries came from the forwards, but the backs were on fire that day. Everything seemed to click and the whole squad were en pointe.RW: How about for the men? Was it the way you rebounded from seven losses in a row in all competitions?Jackson Wray: I think all the bits we learnt along the way helped us win it. By the end of the season, not in terms of playing but how we were day-to-day, we changed massively from where we started. So how we prepared throughout the year. That tough period taught us a lot about ourselves.When you lose or don’t play well, that’s when you find the most out. We stripped a lot back and we focused on other things which ultimately led to us playing some unbelievable stuff towards the end of the year – blowing teams away, physically out-doing teams. That was down mainly to that tough period.It was more a case of us having done things the same for so long; it worked really well and then we realised the pressures and challenges were different. That’s when we realised that we had so much experience, so many top players who had played at the highest level so as a group we were in a different place than we were. We used the group experience to learn from each other and to guide what we do and really find out the direction we wanted to go in.Related: Premiership Players to WatchWe turned a corner and started playing some really good stuff, as well as getting some injured players back – we had some savage injuries last season, which really tested our 60-man squad. At some points we were missing 18 or 20 players for periods. But we picked up points in tough periods. It was a mixture of things.We won the league last year but it feels like we haven’t in lots of ways.RW: What can change this time around?MP: This season we’ve got a new head coach in Alex Austerberry. This season is about lifting, going again and looking at the things that went right last season, but there are a lot of things that we maybe didn’t quite do as a team. So we have a bit more structure. We actually need to become more of a team again, but keep that winning philosophy.Our personal discipline can improve. If you look back to our final in Ealing, Quins could have beaten us if they’d kicked a few of the penalties we gave away. We got let off there. Our defence was phenomenal and we went three or four games without conceding a point, so we need to keep making sure we work hard on that and in attack we need to get our big ball-carriers on the ball, but have that structure between us and buy in.We should play very differently, but still excitingly this season.center_img As Saracens men and women prepare to defend their English titles, we speak to two back-row stars… Read more about changes at Saracens in the latest issue of Rugby World – in shops now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Six Nations Trophies

first_img Six Nations Table 2021 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Millennium trophy is contested between England and Ireland and will be up for grabs in the opening week of the tournament as England face the Irish in Dublin.Centenary Quaich TrophyPerhaps a little unheard of, this trophy is competed for by Ireland and Scotland. Expand Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Six Nations Venues Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Expand Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Giuseppe Garibaldi TrophyFrance and Italy compete for this – let’s call it an ‘unconventional looking’ – trophy. Named after Italian national hero Giuseppe Garibaldi, it commemorates the life of one of the fathers of a unified Italy. He also served in the French Army during the Franco-Prussian War.Auld Alliance TrophyThe newest of all the trophies, Scotland and France competed for it for the first time in 2018.2018: The Auld Alliance trophy was new for the 2018 tournament (Getty Images)Doddie Weir CupWales and Scotland compete for the cup first introduced in Autumn of 2018.Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. What trophies are won during the Six Nations? There are plenty up for grabs so lets take a look at all of them. Six Nations Venues Who is leading the way in the Six… Up for grabs: The two trophies main trophies during the Six Nations (Getty Images) Six Nations Table 2021 We give the lowdown on the six venues… Collapse Six Nations TrophiesThere are several trophies to be won in the Six Nations. Below we have listed them all including the many rivalry trophies.Six Nations TrophiesSix Nations Championship TrophyThe Six Nations Championship Trophy is what all the teams are competing for. The trophy was originally conceived by the Earl of Westmorland, and was first presented to the winners of the 1993 championship, France. This lasted until 2014 when a new trophy was designed which is used today and pictured below.Ultimate Prize: The Six Nations trophy (Getty Images)Triple Crown Trophy The Triple Crown trophy is awarded to the country that beats all the other home nations. England are the current holders of this after beating Scotland, Ireland and Wales during the 2020 tournament. Much like the Grand Slam, this had been an informal honour, however from 2006 onwards, an official trophy was awarded for the achievement.Rivalry TrophiesThere are also several trophies which are awarded for victories in specific matches during the Six Nations. The most famous is the Calcutta Cup.Calcutta CupContested between England and Scotland each year. Named after the Calcutta Rugby Football Club, it was formed after the club was disbanded and the members melted down rupees to make the cup. Scotland won the trophy in 2018 after beating England at Murrayfield and retained it last year after a famous 38-all draw.Rivalry: England and Scotland compete for the Calcutta Cup (Getty Images)Millennium Trophylast_img read more

Rugby Rant: Make wheelchair rugby more inclusive

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby Rant: Make wheelchair rugby more inclusiveBWR, THE governing body of wheelchair rugby in the UK, do a fantastic job. The quad game continues to ascend both domestically and on the international front. But with the relatively new WR5s variant, for me an opportunity is being overlooked.WR5s was introduced to create a competitive outlet for players who have too much physical function to qualify to play the Paralympic quad game. It’s an attempt by a so-called inclusive sport to become more inclusive. And yet for me a strong element of exclusivity remains.At junior level, wheelchair rugby is principally promoted in SEND education environments and is being played by both the able-bodied and individuals with physical impairments. This works well until a child reaches adulthood. At which point a fully able-bodied person would likely no longer qualify to compete.Sitting target: former Wallaby Phil Waugh during an exhibition game at the 2018 Invictus Games (Getty)I feel very uneasy about this. When you also consider that every 
able-bodied person, from the casual sports person to the pro athlete, that has given the sport a try at our taster sessions has got out of their wheelchair at the end exhausted and with a beaming smile on their face, I’m left questioning how inclusive our sport truly is.“Allowing the able-bodied to play 
will make our sport truly inclusive and increase the player base”I’m puzzled by the resistance that exists when it comes to allowing the able-bodied to compete in our fantastic WR5s game. Particularly when you consider that in almost every instance, an able-bodied person would naturally be at a disadvantage when strapped into a rugby wheelchair.For example, an everyday wheelchair user’s upper body will be more suited to propelling a wheelchair than someone getting in a chair only to play the game. The power-to-weight ratio of a person with all four limbs would be inferior to an amputee’s in almost every instance, as they have greater mass to propel. Caught unawares: Tigers’ Joe Smith steals the ball off Northampton (Claire Jones/Redhatphoto.com) I truly believe that taking a leaf out 
of wheelchair basketball’s book by allowing able-bodied people to play WR5s is the way forward.It will make our sport truly inclusive and so increase 
the player base, which in turn will increase wheelchair rugby‘s popularity and 
its coverage in the media.It’s true that red tape and funding hurdles would need to be overcome. But if the desire is there, then no 
objects are insurmountable.Local rivals: Needham (right) closes in on a Northampton opponent (Claire Jones/Redhatphoto.com)This article originally appeared in Rugby World magazine in May.center_img Is wheelchair rugby missing a trick? David Needham, secretary of Leicester Tigers WRC, says a relaxing of the rules would allow the sport to embrace everyone Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Social media reacts to the Iain Henderson try that wasn’t

first_img Social media reacts to the Iain Henderson try that wasn’tThere is always plenty of healthy debate during the Six Nations but during the Italy versus Ireland clash at the Stadio Olimpico, there was one moment that caused almost universal consternation.It didn’t matter in the end with Ireland winning 48-10 in Rome, scoring six tries. But with Ireland pounding their way towards the try-line for a first score, it looked for all the world like lock Iain Henderson had dotted down before the ball bounced away. Italy claimed the ball and managed to clear their lines. Referee Mathieu Raynal and Television Match Official Romain Poite allowed play to go on and never went back.As you can imagine, several people took to Twitter to give their view on the call (or lack of). It looked like Ireland’s lock scored against Italy but match officials didn’t give it Henderson grounds that surely#ITAvIRE #GuinnessSixNations— The 2nd Row (@the2ndRow) February 27, 2021Ireland now have their first win of the 2021 Six Nations. Italy were game, but constantly fell foul of the match officials and ended up some distance off the visitors. #ITAvIRE Henderson had control of the ball when he grounded it …Sexton dismissed by referee Mathieu Raynal like I used to be my teachers at school…..— Pirate Irwin (@pirateirwin) February 27, 2021 There’s a word I like using when faced with the kind of incompetence shown by the referees around that Henderson try.It’s boobery.A display of pure boobery.#ITAvIRE— Dan Mooney (@danielmoonbags) February 27, 2021 I whip this out every match. But here we go again. Ref and TMO looking at Henderson’s try #ITAvIRE pic.twitter.com/ZdasAucPIL— Clare Molloy (@ClareeMolloy) February 27, 2021Related: 2021 Six Nations referees Ireland lock Iain Henderson attempts to score a try (Getty Images) center_img And just after the half-hour mark, full-back Hugo Keenan sliced through for another Irish try and a few minutes later, flanker Will Conners (who was already having a hell of a game at the breakdown) helped himself to a score too.The back-rower would finish the match with a brace and CJ Stander and Keith Earls would get in on the try-scoring act too. On the other side, Johan Meyer got a first-half consolation score but that was the only five-pointer the hosts could muster.Ireland had so much momentum throughout the match… And still, the Henderson try that wasn’t was a big talking point. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As you can see, plenty of voices showing bewilderment at the lack of action from the officials.Related: Double movement in rugby explainedIt did not hold Ireland back too much. Not long after Ireland were right back where they started and after building pressure, centre Garry Ringrose crashed over for Ireland’s first try. Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagramlast_img read more

Wales’ finest stained glass gets window online

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Anna MorrellPosted Jan 25, 2012 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Church of Wales] Anyone interested in church history can now view and research more than 2,000 stained glass windows from hundreds of churches in Wales online.From medieval to modern, the windows have been photographed and catalogued in a project by the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies. The website allows all the windows to be searched thematically by date, artist or location.The project was initiated by the artist and photographer Martin Crampin. “Stained glass is part of the visual vocabulary of many of our churches, and a pictorial manifestation of the church’s faith and tradition,” he said. “Yet often little is known of the artists or studios that made them, and sometimes the meaning of the windows is unclear to those that worship in their midst today.”The catalogue covers stained glass from medieval times up to the present day, including the fine collections of medieval glass, imported continental glass, work by the large Victorian firms and artists of the arts and crafts movement, as well as more recent windows by artists trained and based in Wales from the second half of the 20th century up to the present day.Although the funding for the project has come to an end, long before a complete survey has been possible, it is hoped that the catalogue will continue to grow in the future. It is now possible to add further information and comments to the site.Further information is available here.— Anna Morrell is the Archbishop of Wales’ media officer. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Wales’ finest stained glass gets window online Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Communion Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

New Zealand province to divest fossil fuel shares

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Posted May 19, 2014 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Fossil Fuel Divestment New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME jaan Sass says: Featured Events Comments are closed. Tags Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Anglican Taonga] The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia has become the first province in the Anglican Communion to pledge to divest from fossil fuels.The provincial synod May 14 passed a resolution that requires the church “to take all reasonable steps” to divest its shares in fossil fuel companies by its next synod, in mid-2016.Rod Oram, who moved the proposal, told synod that it “gives us the opportunity to offer leadership on, and to make a practical response to, climate change.“Thus, it speaks to two marks of our Christian mission: care of creation and righting unjust social structures.“Of all the ways in which we live unsustainably,” he said, “it is climate change that is causing the gravest harm – right now, here and around the world – to the very ecosystem on which our existence depends.”And climate change, he said, is being driven “simply by pumping a rapidly rising volume of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases” into the atmosphere.Oram, who is a journalist specializing in economic issues, said one of the key needs was to “shift the weight of investment away from fossil fuels into sustainable forms of energy” – and that had led to a worldwide campaign to persuade investors to sell their shares in fossil fuel companies.While the ethical imperatives for divesting are clear, Oram said, there are also a number of practical financial reasons – to do with safeguarding returns for investors – for doing so.The motion drew impassioned support from Tikanga Pasefika speakers, most notably Bishop Api Qiliho, who said the survival of Pacific Island people was at stake.There were notes of caution, however, from Mark Wilcox, general manager of the Anglican Pension Board.He told synod that the pension board manages $160 million of funds on behalf of its members, many of whom are retired or serving clergy.Wilcox said the board took its ethical investment philosophy seriously, and had wrestled with how to respond “to the growing tide of sentiment around the world for divestment of fossil fuel investments.”But it also had to take its fiduciary obligations to its members equally seriously.“Very broadly, if a divestment program risks having a significant financial detriment, we cannot legally divest.”In other words, if the pension board can’t reinvest the funds into other investments that offer a similarly good return/risk profile, “then we can’t do it.”Wilcox advised that the board had recently analyzed its portfolio and determined that divestment within two years may not be possible. However, the situation would be monitored on an ongoing basis.Two of synod’s Tikanga Pasefika members proposed an amendment (carried) which asked synod to set up a group to advise on reinvesting the divested funds into conservation of ecosystems and biodiversity “in regions that are vulnerable to climate change and sea level rise.”The debate came to an unusual end. Because of one particularly long speech, it had continued well past the afternoon tea break and looked likely to go on a good deal longer.But the Rev. Michael Wallace called a point of order, asking for the motion to be put to the vote, there and then.It was – as standing orders require – and was passed. New Zealand province to divest fossil fuel shares Synod requires ‘all reasonable steps’ to divest shares in companies by mid-2016 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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Much of their claims have been dis proven. The earth cycles thru periods of cooling and warming. Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Elizabeth G. Maxwell installed as rector of The Church of…

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted May 15, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC May 16, 2015 at 1:51 pm Mother Liz was at Holy Apostles when my wife and I started going there in the spring of 2001. She was most significant in my life as a confessor and I cherish my memories of her at the altar, with very pertinent sermons, and a lovely voice singing the liturgy. I wish her well at Ascension. The Rev. Elizabeth G. Maxwell was installed on May13 as the 12th rector of The Church of the Ascension in New York City by the Rt. Rev. Andrew M.L. Dietsche, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York.On Wednesday, May 13, 2015, The Rev. Elizabeth G. Maxwell was installed as the 12th Rector of The Church of the Ascension in New York City. She is the first woman Rector since the Manhattan church was founded in 1827. The first church was on Canal Street, but was destroyed by fire. The present site at Fifth Avenue and 10th Street was chosen for a new church designed by Richard Upjohn and consecrated on November 5, 1841.Mother Liz has lived and worked in Manhattan for 25 years, first as Associate Rector of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Chelsea, including Program Director of the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen, and then as Interim Pastor of St. Michael’s Church on the Upper West Side. She is a graduate of Duke University and Princeton Theological Seminary, and was ordained in the Diocese of Newark in 1983, serving there before coming to the Diocese of New York.The sanctuary was filled as hundreds gathered in the church for her installation by The Rt. Rev. Andrew M.L. Dietsche, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York. The spirited procession included the vestry, search committee, church staff, clergy friends and colleagues, and the Ascension choir.During the “induction” section of the service representatives of the congregation and the clergy of the diocese presented Mother Liz with gifts as symbols of Ascension’s ministries including: a Bible from the Sunday School, a vessel of baptismal water from the Bishop, a clerical stole from the acolytes and lectors, pantry food and tutoring books from Ascension Outreach, a book of prayer for spiritual formation, olive oil for healing, a hymnal companion from the choir, a pineapple as a sign of our “juicy” hospitality and fellowship, blueprints for stewardship of our historic buildings, the canons for ministry in the wider church, a book of sacred poetry for interfaith worship, a Canterbury T-shirt for ministry with the higher educational institutions that surround the church, a statue of St. Fiacre for the care of our gardens, bread and wine from the Altar Guild, a tray and cups symbolizing the church’s water table during the Gay Pride march every June, and a key to the “the church of the open door.” Following the Induction Mother Liz was welcomed as the new Rector and was greeted with thunderous and lengthy applause, after which she thanked everyone. She then introduced her family and extended family, offering special thanks to her daughter Mihret Lucy and their dog Finn.The sermon was delivered by The Rev. Elizabeth A. Sherman, Rector, St. Francis’ Church, San Francisco and the Gospeller was The Rev. Edwin Chinery, Assisting Priest at Ascension. Jubilant and beautiful music was provided by Dr. Dennis Keene, organist and choir master, conducting the Ascension choir. The service was followed by an exuberant and festive reception in the Parish Hall.As the first church to be built on Fifth Avenue, Ascension has long held an important and notable role in Lower Manhattan; parishioners have included many prominent New Yorkers who exhibited remarkable social concern early in the church. The church’s history as a leader in progressive causes included establishing the first day nursery for babies and young children of working mothers and several missions and chapels. The parish continues this tradition today offering a neighborhood food pantry, tutoring program, hosting support groups in the church facilities and sponsoring arts and cultural programs. The church is also known for its architectural, artistic and musical heritage, including the painting of “The Ascension of Our Lord” above the main altar by John La Farge (1835-1910). With the addition of The Manton Memorial Organ in 2011 the parish has one of the premier organs in the world and hosts concerts and an annual organ academy. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Martinsville, VA Comments are closed. 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VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Elizabeth G. Maxwell installed as rector of The Church of the Ascension, New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska People Robert Campbell says: Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more