Governor Wolf, Pittsburgh Penguins Announce PAsmart Grant to Expand Science and Technology Education

first_imgGovernor Wolf, Pittsburgh Penguins Announce PAsmart Grant to Expand Science and Technology Education February 06, 2019 Education,  PAsmart,  Press Release,  Schools That Teach Pittsburgh, PA – The day after unveiling a plan to create the strongest workforce in the nation, Governor Tom Wolf was joined by Pittsburgh Penguins President and CEO David Morehouse to announce a $442,000 PAsmart advancing grant has been awarded to the Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation. The state grant will help expand the foundation’s STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) Lending Library to benefit thousands of students across western Pennsylvania.“Over the next decade, seven in ten new jobs in Pennsylvania will require workers to use computers and new technologies in a constantly changing economy,” said Governor Wolf. “I launched PAsmart last year to help students and adults get the skills for those emerging careers.“Investing in projects like the STEAM Lending Library will help students from our cities to our rural communities gain the skills for good jobs here in Pennsylvania that will make our communities stronger.”The Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation, the Citrone Family, and the Allegheny Intermediate Unit established the STEAM Lending Library in 2015. The library is the first of its kind in the nation and allows school districts to borrow the latest educational technology equipment to enhance classroom learning.“The Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation is honored to be the first recipient of a PAsmart advanced grant,” said David Morehouse, president and CEO of the Penguins. “We salute Governor Wolf for his commitment to workforce development and expanded classroom instruction for our students. This amazing grant will enable the Foundation to extend its STEAM education work across 22 counties, encompassing 206 school districts.”Governor Wolf launched PAsmart last year as a groundbreaking approach to prepare students and workers for the jobs of today and tomorrow through STEM and computer science education, apprenticeship and job training.Last month, the Wolf Administration announced the initial wave of PAsmart competitive grants. The $8.7 million in targeted grants will expand computer science classes and teacher training at 765 schools across the commonwealth. Additional PAsmart advancing grants for STEM and computer science, apprenticeships and job training will be announced in the coming weeks.Governor Wolf’s budget expands on the successful launch of PAsmart to create the strongest workforce in the nation that drives the strongest economy. The governor’s Statewide Workforce, Education, and Accountability Program (SWEAP) provides opportunities for Pennsylvanians from birth to retirement.The proposal expands access to early childhood education, increases investments in schools, and partners with the private sector to build on the PAsmart initiative, a groundbreaking approach to workforce development for Pennsylvania’s economy. Governor Wolf’s goal is to develop innovative solutions that close the skills gap and rapidly meet the needs of employers.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Paid parental leave is good for mums, Australian study

first_imgHerald Sun 1 May 2017Family First Comment: Interesting survey from Australia“Better physical health was likely due to delaying putting children into childcare, which increases the “immediate likelihood of contracting infectious diseases”, the University of Melbourne study said. Reduced stress from having a secure income and less pressure to return to work may be behind the better mental health results.”… “Ten to 20 per cent of new mothers suffer depression in the first year of their baby’s life, and women who go back to work within six months have poorer mental health. Dr Hewitt said the study was likely to underestimate the total life benefits because it only focused on the first year after the policy started.”Taxpayer-funded maternity leave boosts the mental and physical health of new mothers, a study of more than 5000 Australian women has found. The introduction of the paid parental scheme of 18 weeks’ pay at minimum wage delivered significant benefits to all new mums in the first year of their baby’s life. Better physical health was likely due to delaying putting children into childcare, which increases the “immediate likelihood of contracting infectious diseases”, the University of Melbourne study said. Reduced stress from having a secure income and less pressure to return to work may be behind the better mental health results.Prior to the introduction of paid parental leave in 2011, women who worked continuously for the same employer got a period of unpaid leave for at least 12 months and the right to return to the same position. Less than half of mothers had access to paid leave from their company — usually those in the public sector or large organisations.The researchers surveyed mothers before and after the introduction of the scheme, finding small but significant improvements in their health 12 months after giving birth. “Overall, the study provides evidence that introducing paid maternity leave universally delivers health benefits to mothers,” lead author Dr Belinda Hewitt said. The World Health Organisation recommends all babies are breastfed for the first six months of their life.Writing in Social Science and Medicine, Dr Hewitt said social policies which alleviated family role stressors and pressures for women to return to work while breastfeeding could significantly improve maternal health and wellbeing. Ten to 20 per cent of new mothers suffer depression in the first year of their baby’s life, and women who go back to work within six months have poorer mental health. Dr Hewitt said the study was likely to underestimate the total life benefits because it only focused on the first year after the policy started.READ MORE: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/paid-parental-leave-is-good-for-mums-australian-study-shows/news-story/fe71d143dce74b6a9117ebdf2b1af662last_img read more

Chelsea close in on deal for AFC Wimbledon ground

first_img Press Association The deal will raise funds for the League Two club’s proposed move to a new stadium at their original home of Merton. The Blues want to use the Cherry Red Records Stadium to host their youth and ladies’ matches. At a special general meeting on Monday night the Dons Trust, the largest shareholder of AFC Wimbledon, voted overwhelmingly in favour of selling the stadium lease. The next stage of the process will be for AFC Wimbledon PLC shareholders to pass a similar resolution in December, although that should be a formality as the Dons Trust controls over 90 per cent of the shares. Dons Trust chairman Matthew Breach told the Trust’s website: ” The successful vote on the stadium sale is an important milestone in helping to return AFC Wimbledon to its spiritual home in Merton. “On behalf of the Dons Trust board, I would like to thank our members for voting in such large numbers and for backing our proposals so unambiguously. “There is still a lot of work to do to deliver a new stadium but the outcome of the vote shows the overwhelming support among Trust members and the club’s fans for having AFC Wimbledon play where it belongs, back in Merton.” AFC Wimbledon bought the lease on the ground from non-league Kingstonian FC in 2003. The club, formed after the original Wimbledon relocated to Milton Keynes and became MK Dons, plan to build a new stadium where the old club used to play at Plough Lane. center_img Chelsea have moved a step closer to completing the purchase of AFC Wimbledon’s ground at Kingsmeadow.last_img read more

Chicago man gets 15 year prison sentence for stealing lawn mower from Mason City store

first_imgMASON CITY — It’s 15 years in prison for a Chicago man accused of stealing a lawn mower from a Mason City store. 45-year-old Calvin Lacey pleaded guilty to second-degree theft as a habitual offender. Lacey and Charles Ross of Des Moines were accused of stealing a lawn mower from Mills Fleet Farm in September 2018. Charges of possession of a theft detection removal device and possession of methamphetamine were dismissed as part of Lacey’s guilty plea. District Judge Karen Salic sentenced Lacey on Monday to 15 years in prison, with the sentence to be served at the same time as a 52-month federal prison term on an unrelated case of being a felon in possession of a firearm. Ross previously pleaded guilty in the lawn mower theft case to second-degree theft, possession of a theft detection device and possession of meth. He was sentenced to seven years in prison.last_img read more