Listen: Returned faces rising the optimism for Ryan McHugh

first_imgRyan McHugh believes Donegal’s jigsaw is piecing together at just the right time.Donegal staged a stirring second-half comeback yesterday at Pairc Ui Rinn to overcome Cork and put them firmly in the promotion shake-up.Definitely delighted, first and foremost with the win,” McHugh said. “That’s what we came for, to go back with two points.“We’d be disappointed with the last five minutes of the first half but, after that, we showed good composure and good skill to kick 1-13 in the second half.”Yesterday marked the returns of the likes  of Neil McGee and Paddy McGrath to a playing capacity with Michael Murphy making his first start of the year.McHugh said: “It’s great to get back as a squad and as a team. You want to have the best players playing every day.’ The 2018 All-Star was speaking to Ocean FM’s Paddy McGill. Listen to the full interview below … Listen: Returned faces rising the optimism for Ryan McHugh was last modified: March 16th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:2019 Allianz League Division 2CorkMichael Murphyneil mcgeePaddy McGrathRyan McHughlast_img read more

QPR v Bolton: Ramsey makes changes

first_imgChris Ramsey has made four changes for today’s game at Loftus Road.With Charlie Austin and Jamie Mackie both unavailable, the QPR head coach has given Jay Emmanuel-Thomas his first start of the season.Leroy Fer also starts and there are recalls for Grant Hall and Daniel Tozser, with Massimo Luongo, James Perch and Alejandro Faurlin dropped to the bench.Striker Sebastian Polter, fit again after a hamstring injury, is also among the Rangers substitutes.Bolton, meanwhile, welcome back Dorian Dervite after suspension.QPR: Green, Onuoha, Angella, Hall, Konchesky; Tozser, Henry, Phillips, Fer, Chery; Emmanuel-Thomas.Subs: Smithies, Perch, Sandro, Doughty, Luongo, Polter, Faurlin.Bolton: Amos, Pisano, Dervite, Prince, Moxey, Davies, Danns, Pratley, Feeney, Clayton, Madine.Subs: Rachubka, Vela, Spearing, Casado, Wellington, Dobbie, Wheater.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

How Climate Influenced the Dead Sea and History

first_imgThe Dead Sea, the lowest lake on earth (1368 ft below sea level), figures prominently in the Bible.  Near this body of water, Lot settled and the cities of the plain were destroyed.  David wandered here, battles were fought nearby, and Herod built a fortress at Masada overlooking the lake.  Later, Moslems and Crusaders left marks of their conquests in the region.  Did the Dead Sea preserve a record of climactic changes that affected not only the Great Rift Valley in which it resides, but also the whole land of Israel?  Students of Biblical history will be interested in two papers about the Dead Sea published in the May Bulletin of the Geological Society of America.    The first paper by R. Bookman (Ken-Tor) et al.1 reconstructs a curve of lake levels during historic times.  Currently, the Dead Sea is at a record low due to diversion of Jordan River waters for irrigation.  This has exposed historic shorelines for analysis.  The team took radiocarbon dates of organic material at three sites around the lake to discern periods when the lake shore rose and fell.  They then correlated the lake levels with cultural changes occurring in Palestine at those times:Highstands occurred in the second and first centuries B.C. and the fourth century A.D. during the Roman and early Byzantine periods, respectively, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries A.D. during the Crusader period, and at the end of the nineteenth century A.D.  The rises mark a significant change in the annual rainfall in the region, which likely exceeded the instrumentally measured modern average.    The curve also indicates drastic drops that exposed the sedimentary sequences to erosion.  The oldest and probably deepest drop in the lake level culminated during the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries B.C. after a retreat from a higher lake stand.  The longest lowstand occurred after the Byzantine period and continued at least until the ninth century A.D.  This arid period coincided with the invasion of Moslem-Arab tribes into the area during the seventh century A.D.The team estimated that high-water levels correspond to annual Jerusalem rainfall rates of 26 inches per year or more, and low-water levels to droughts of 18-20 in/yr or less.  Thus Dead Sea lake levels are indicators of overall climate in Palestine.  The oldest part of the curve is the least certain, but seems to indicate a high water level during the patriarchal period:The oldest sediments described (unit I, Fig. 5) correspond to a lake level higher than 411 mbsl dated to 2140�1445 B.C. (3703 � 37 and 3220 � 36 radiocarbon yr B.P., Table 1).  At that time the lake level was falling from an earlier highstand (prior to the fifteenth century B.C.), but no indicator for the absolute lake-level elevation was found at our sites.  However, unit I may correspond to a distinct shore ridge identified in a western location in the Nahal Darga fan delta (Fig. 1C ) at 370 mbsl, where its age was estimated at 3000�4000 yr B.P.The second paper by David-Novak et al.2 examined debris flows in the canyons around the Dead Sea.  Unusually strong storms in 1995 and 1997 allowed them to calibrate, for the first time, the rainfall conditions necessary to trigger a debris flow in an arid environment.  The 1995 storm, in which a convective cell hovered over the area and dumped rain at rates nearly 2 inches per hour, was the most severe and resulted in debris flows in all the canyons under the heaviest rain; the 1997 storm was milder and more localized to the plateau, and only resulted in three debris flows.  Since rainfall measurements were available for these storms, they were able to interpolate an estimate for the rainfall rate necessary to trigger a debris flow, and found the threshold to be approximately 30mm/hr for at least one hour (1.2 inches per hour).  Surprisingly, they found evidence for prehistoric debris flows was rare.  They estimate only zero to three debris flows occurred during the last 3000 years, but they admit that “it is possible that some deposits, mainly at the larger basins, were formed by multiple flows that are currently indistinguishable.”    Although “Debris flows are major processes of sediment transport in arid regions, particularly in areas of high relief,” their rarity has made it difficult to measure the rainfall necessary to trigger them.  Fortunately, at Nahal Arugot and Nahal David on the western slopes of the Dead Sea, rain gauges and a stream flow measurement station were available for the intense storms of 1995 and 1997.1R. Bookman (Ken-Tor), Y. Enzel, A. Agnon and M. Stein, “Late Holocene lake levels of the Dead Sea,” Geological Society of America Bulletin Vol. 116, No. 5 (May/June 2004), pp. 555�571, doi: 10.1130/B25286.1.2 Hagit Ben David-Novak, Efrat Morin and Yehouda Enzel, “Modern extreme storms and the rainfall thresholds for initiating debris flows on the hyperarid western escarpment of the Dead Sea, Israel,” Geological Society of America Bulletin Vol. 116, No. 5 (May/June 2004) pp. 718�728, doi: 10.1130/B25403.2.Bible study is enhanced by considering the environment in which the great sagas of history took place.  How did the geology, climate, zoology, botany, mineralogy, topography and hydrology affect culture, or influence decisions of kings and tribal groups?  Availability of water, for instance, is a primary deciding factor for settlers, and strongly influences the locations of cities and roads.  Of particular interest is the story of Abraham and Lot.  Anyone looking at the Dead Sea shores today would wonder why Lot would find the place attractive; today, it is hot, dry and nearly devoid of vegetation.  Yet when Lot viewed it, it was “well watered everywhere (before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah) like the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt as you go toward Zoar” (Gen. 13:10).  Was this desert once a garden?    Though scientific investigations of the past depend on assumptions, studies that can be corroborated by eyewitnesses have more credibility.  The paper on Dead Sea lake levels lends support to Lot’s description of its environs.  Now that probable remains of the wicked cities of Sodom and Gomorrah have been found (along with evidence of their fiery destruction) the historicity of the Biblical account has been strengthened, because these ruins hint at thriving civilizations that must have prospered under a milder, wetter climate than is found there today.  Also, from this paper one can see why Herod would have found Jericho and Masada attractive for his palaces, if Palestine were enjoying one of the well-watered periods.  Between those times, from after the Exodus through the monarchies, David and the Judean kings would apparently have found the Dead Sea region much like we see it today, since by the patriarchal period the lake level was falling rapidly, such that “The oldest and probably deepest drop in the lake level culminated during the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries B.C. after a retreat from a higher lake stand.”  A long era of drought would also shed light on the heroic efforts of Hezekiah to protect the Gihon Spring (see 09/10/2003 headline).  Perhaps the “land flowing with milk and honey” was subjected to drought as God’s judgment for Israel’s disobedience, just as prophesied by Moses (see Deuteronomy 28).    The second paper on debris flows is not as pertinent to Bible history, but is important for understanding the conditions necessary for rapid geologic change.  Huge alluvial fans are common in deserts of the world.  Southern California, particularly Death Valley, has massive alluvial aprons surrounding arid peaks in regions of (currently) low rainfall.  The paper shows that a lot can happen in a short time if the rain is concentrated and intense.  Combine that fact with the first paper, that rainfall was more plentiful in ancient times in the Dead Sea region.  There is no reason to reject the possibility that major geological change took place rapidly under the right conditions.  In Red Rock Canyon State Park, California, a usually dry and arid desert, an intense storm under a localized convection cell in 1997 caused a flood that washed out a major highway, deposited mud three feet deep in trailers, and carried objects as big as refrigerators far down the channel.  They estimate this was a “once in 300 to 500 year flood” for the area.  Extrapolating present erosion rates, say from 1990 to 1996, would have been very misleading.  But how do they know these floods are so rare, even at Red Rock?  No settlers who kept records inhabited the area as long as 300 years ago.  Did the formation of large erosional features like alluvial fans require a little water a lot of time, or a lot of water a little time?  Science is limited to make such determinations when they cannot be cross-checked by observations.  These scientists estimated “zero to three” Holocene debris flows in the Dead Sea canyons they investigated, but admitted there could have been more that were indistinguishable.    Today, when you drive through the desert, you see landforms that look static, ancient, and unchanging.  You can come back year after year and see no difference.  All it takes is a flood or earthquake big enough, and you would hardly recognize the place.  Geologists have been becoming increasingly aware of the power of catastrophic agents to effect rapid change.  Perhaps much of what we observe today is not slowly-evolving landforms, but relicts of intense, concentrated forces in the past.(Visited 31 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Regulators and airlines face off on credit card fees

first_imgTravellers Down Under are celebrating the end of punitive surcharges on airline tickets after Australia recently ecame only the second jurisdiction in the world to ban profiteering on credit and debit card fees.But it remains to be seen how airlines and others will react in the long term after the government closed off a lucrative source of so-called ancillary revenue that had been earning them as much as $A68 on an airline booking for a family of four.And the unintended consequences will be closely monitored after the first credit/debit card surcharge ban in the European Union, introduced in December 2015, prompted airlines to introduce new fees to circumvent the government action.From September 1, the four major airlines in Australia have dropped the flat surcharges on ticket purchases of $A7 per booking for Qantas and Virgin Australia and $A8.50 per sector on Qantas low-cost subsidiary Jetstar and Virgin Australia low-cost subsidiary Tigerair.However, in response to “indicative” guidelines published in May by the Reserve Bank of Australia on the cost of transactions that companies such as airlines are now banned from exceeding — 0.5% for debit cards and 1-1.5% for most credit cards, but 2-3% for American Express —  the airlines have adopted widely varying standards that they’re passing on to their customers.On Jetstar, for example, the surcharge for a ticket purchase via debit card – previously a flat $A8.50 per sector or $17 per round trip – is now just 0.48 per cent of the purchase price – 48 cents on a $A100 ticket.Its competitor Tigerair’s fees are nearly double that at 0.88 per cent for debit card purchases.The downside is that many travellers, particularly business class travellers on international journeys could pay substantially more now under the percentage fee system than previously under a set fee, although Qantas now caps the surcharge at $A70 for both debit and credit cards.What’s not known, however, are the consequences for credit card perks after European consumers reported that some of theirs had disappeared. Euro airlines are also applying surcharges that are many multiples of the EU-specified costs of 0.2 per cent for debit cards and 0.3 per cent for credit cards.Airlines in the United Kingdom, for example, have been applying surcharges of 1.5 to 3.0 per cent, as well as set amounts of up to £13 ($US17) on top. It’s not yet clear what effect Britain’s decision to leave the EU will have on UK government policy.The chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Rod Sims, has anticipated the potential for unforeseen consequences.”That’s been a fair bit thought about,” he told AirlineRatings.com. “Obviously this change is a government initiative but we did engage with government trying to think through negative consequences.”The main one was that most people don’t charge a surcharge and this could encourage them to do something they weren’t doing before, but they could have done anything before and they chose to do nothing.”It’s not clear to me that being able to charge 1.5 per cent  is going to encourage them to do that we they could have done even more before. I don’t think we’re going to run into those sorts of problems.”Sims says compliance by airlines with the new regime has been excellent and he doesn’t expect problems.”What happens when you get a law that’s targeted at a particular behaviour, the main companies like the airlines and the event organisers really know the game is up and we have engaged with them extensively and they’ve made the necessary changes,” he says.”They have, I think, realised the game is up and they’ve been very co-operative and the changes seem to be the ones that should be made.Sims says, however, the ACCC will be watching closely.”We’ll see over time,” he says. “I think this thing will be fairly self-policing. That is, you’ve got the companies that were seriously in the gun who have made the changes and other who probably aren’t as visible, if they start charging these sort of things (high fees),  I think there’ll be enough people aware of the fact that’s wrong and will get contact.”All it takes is a couple of contacts to us and we know there’s a problem and we can get onto it.  It should be straightforward to follow up those who are trying to do the wrong thing.”America and Asia, meanwhile, are still relatively free of credit card charging restriction.The US Congress about five years agreed to it agreed to cap so-called “swipe fees” on debit cards. However, lobbying by banks left the cap at around 25 US cents – twice as high as initially recommended by the Federal Reserve and an estimated five times banks’ cost of processing debit transactions.Congress has not yet addressed credit card fees.last_img read more

INSIDE SPORT WORLD CUP FEATURE

first_imgTouch Football Australia has received a massive publicity boost with a feature story on Australia’s 2007 Federation of International Touch World Cup campaign being featured in the November Issue of Inside Sport, Australia’s most respected Sporting magazine.For more than 14 Years, the Inside Sport team has combined thoughtful, hard-hitting and in-depth feature writing with lighter, more irreverent and bite-sized sporting tidbits for every sporting palate. With a Circulation of 52,529 and a Readership of 155,000, the magazine has mass popularity and reach all over Australia, and this is a major coup for Touch Football.Aaron Scott, a journalist for “Inside Sport” magazine tracked the progress of the Australian World Cup Men’s, Women’s, and Mixed Open Teams for the first two days of the 22-24 September Training Camp held in Sydney at Cronulla’s Toyota Park.Aaron interviewed various players, coaches, and officials over Friday and Saturday and was amazed at the speed of the game and the talent and dexterity players possessed across a range of fitness and game play disciplines.Touch aficionados will appreciate the article’s portrayal of Touch Football as a viable sport in its’ own right in Australia and around the World.The essence of our game and the athleticism, skill level, and professionalism of our National Open players was encapsulated well.The article is featured on pages 30–31 of the November issue of Inside Sport – so go and get yourself a copy of Inside Sport and see our sport in all its’ glory!last_img read more

Video: Indiana Signee Ogugua Anunoby Throws Down A Sick Between-The-Legs Dunk

first_imgIndiana Signee Ogugua Aunoby dunks after going between the legs.Indiana Signee Ogugua AunobyWith the returns of James Blackmon and Yogi Ferrell, as well as the addition of five-star big man Thomas Bryant, Indiana projects as a top-20 team next season. Bryant and four-star Juwan Morgan are the big names of the Hoosiers’ incoming freshman class, but a third frontcourt player, Ogugua Anunoby, has some talent of his own. Anunoby, a 6-foot-8 three-star small forward from Jefferson City (Mo.), posted this video to his Instagram tonight. It was re-posted by the Indiana men’s basketball program’s official Instagram, and it features Anunoby throwing down an impressive, 180-degree between-the-legs dunk. Pretty good. We’re sure Hoosier fans will be salivating once they see this.last_img read more

Ottawas mishandling of Jordans Principle means gaps delays and denials for First

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsThe Canadian Human Rights Tribunal has ordered for the full implementation of Jordan’s Principle to ensure equal healthcare for Indigenous children in a decision released Tuesday.The order was part of the long-awaited ruling released Tuesday that detailed how Canada discriminates against Indigenous people in its policies and funding of child welfare on-reserve.The goal of Jordan’s Principle is to ensure Indigenous children on-reserve have equal access to healthcare.“(Indigenous Affairs) is also ordered to cease applying its narrow definition of Jordan’s Principle and to take measures to immediately implement the full meaning and scope of Jordan’s principle,” the tribunal said in its 182-page. “More than just funding, there is a need to refocus the policy of the program to respect human rights principles and sound social work practice.”Who pays for health services on-reserve – the province, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, or Health Canada – can be complicated. Jordan’s Principle dictates care for the child first and fight over who pays later.Despite the House of Commons unanimously adopting Jordan’s Principle in 2007, Indigenous Affairs went on to define the principle so narrowly, that it said no cases existed.‎The human rights tribunal didn’t agree.“Such an approach defeats the purpose of Jordan’s Principle and results in service gaps, delays and denials for First Nations children on reserve,” the decision said.Jordan’s Principle is named after Jordan River Anderson, a young boy with severe special needs from Manitoba’s remote Norway House Cree Nation. He died in hospital while the province and federal government fought over his care. He never got to see his home.Ottawa came up with a complicated definition. It only applied the principle to situations in which there was a dispute between the federal government and the province over who should pay for a service needed by a child on-reserve with multiple disabilities requiring multiple health services.“It is Health Canada’s and AANDC’s narrow interpretation of Jordan’s Principle that results in there being no cases meeting the criteria for Jordan’s Principle,” the tribunal ruled. “Jordan’s Principle is meant to apply to all First Nations children. There are many other First Nations children without multiple disabilities who require services, including child and family services. Having to put a child in care in order to access those services, when those services are available to all other Canadians is one of the main reasons this Complaint was made.”Tribunal panel members heard hundreds of hours of testimony over 76 days of hearings. Thousands of documents were submitted in a fight that began in 2007 when Cindy Blackstock, a First Nations’ child welfare advocate along with Assembly of First Nations, filed a human rights complaint.The panel found Canada’s position “unreasonable, unconvincing and not supported by the preponderance of evidence in this case.”In an interview last December, Blackstock said documents show a federal bureaucracy working to protect politicians over the needs of Indigenous children.“It’s very clear to me they completely didn’t get it,” Blackstock said at the time. “Or even if they did get it, they felt the moral course was to deny children services and I think that’s unconscionable. There shouldn’t be more red tape for them to jump, there shouldn’t be longer waits. They shouldn’t be denied services because they’re First Nations’ children.”Three years ago, Mi’kmaw woman Maurina Beadle, took the federal government to court for not providing equal healthcare services for her son Jeremy Meawasige, who has special needs.When Beadle had a stroke in 2010, her band the Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia, picked up the tab for Jeremy’s extra home care. But argued that it was a cost Ottawa should cover. And not doing so made it a case of Jordan’s Principle.The courts agreed. Beadle won her case.A year later, Ottawa appealed. And an internal federal document puts that decision squarely at the feet of then Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, who was defeated in October’s election.“Minister Valcourt, the federal lead for Jordan’s Principle, decided to have the Crown appeal the decision on May 6, 2013, on the principle that the Judge erred in his interpretation of JP,” noted a memo labelled “secret.”Ottawa had consistently argued no cases of Jordan’s Principle existed.Emails between federal officials at Health Canada paint a different picture.“There will likely be more cases coming forward so we will definitely need a good tracking system,” the documents said.Blackstock pointed to a April 15, 2013 document, which summarizes a call between officials with Health Canada and Aboriginal and Northern Affairs discussing how to narrow the impact of Beadle’s court victory.The memo detailed how two bureaucrats decided the Pictou Landing case “will be labelled as a JP case, that way it can be treated as an isolated case and the interim remedy can be limited to this case alone.”Blackstock said that document showed how the Harper government saw Jordan’s Principle as a way of limiting the services for kids.A lot has changed since these emails and briefing notes were volleyed back and forth between bureaucrats. The Liberals now form a majority government.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has issued its report. Recommendation Number 3: “We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.”In its decision, the tribunal left the remedies – how government should fix this problem – for a later date. Reaction from the Liberal Government is still to come.Blackstock and the Assembly of First Nations will hold a press conference later Tuesday.Back in December, when Blackstock still had her fingers crossed over the tribunal decision, she said whatever changes happen, it’s not just about more money for child welfare and health services for First Nations.“The bureaucracy is still in place,” said Blackstock. “And their particular goal appears to be to have protected the minister and they didn’t make the effort to really ensure that children were the focal point of benefitting from federal services. I’m hoping we see that change.For Blackstock, it’s a matter of making sure that memo makes it through the red tape.“I’m hoping the federal government immediately instructs the bureaucrats to make sure these changes reach down into the levels of kids,” she said.troache@aptn.calast_img read more

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (16,039.26, down 42.83 points)Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Healthcare. Up 60 cents, or 14.85 per cent, to $4.64 on 39.02 million shares.Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED). Healthcare. Up 63 cents, or 3.26 per cent, to $19.98 on 9.3 million shares.Aimia Inc. (TSX:AIM). Loyalty programs. Up 41 cents, or 14.64 per cent, to $3.21 on 6.04 million shares.Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE). Oil and gas. Down 16 cents, 1.11 per cent, to $14.28 on 5.4 million shares.Obsidian Energy Ltd. (TSX:OBE). Oil and gas. Up two cents, 1.32 per cent, to $1.53 on 3.9 million shares.NexGen Energy Ltd. (TSX:NXE). Miner. Down 11 cents, or 3.62 per cent, to $2.93 on 3.8 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ). Oil and gas. Up 11 cents, or 0.24 per cent, to $46.30 on 1.9 million shares. The company is considering adding a 30,000- to 40,000-barrel-per-day bitumen-only project to its Horizon oilsands mine to take advantage of excess ore production and pipeline capacity. The proposed project could be approved as early as 2019 and would continue a trend in the sector to bolt on brownfield production to avoid the high costs and risks of building new mines from scratch.Hydro One Ltd. (TSX:H). Utilities. Down 27 cents, or 1.17 per cent, to $22.71 on 444,246 shares. Ontario’s largest electricity distributor says its third-quarter profit was down six per cent from last year as a result of costs associated with the proposed $6.7-billion acquisition of Avista Corp., a U.S. utility company based in Spokane, Wash. Profit attributable to common shareholders was $219 million (37 cents per share), down from $233 million (40 cents per share) last year. Excluding the costs associated with Avista, Hydro One’s adjusted profit was up two per cent at $237 million.last_img read more

3 Miss America officials resign 1 apologizes to exwinner

first_imgATLANTIC CITY, N.J. – The top leadership of the Miss America Organization, implicated in an email scandal that targeted past pageant winners for abuse based on their appearance, intellect and sex lives, resigned on Saturday, with the outgoing president apologizing to a winner whose weight he ridiculed.The president, Josh Randle, told The Associated Press his comment responding to an email to his private account about the physical appearance of 2013 winner Mallory Hagan came months before he started working for the Miss America Organization in 2015. But he said it was wrong.“I apologize to Mallory for my lapse in judgment,” Randle said on Saturday. “It does not reflect my values or the values I worked to promote at the Miss America Organization. Although this terrible situation was not caused or driven by me, in light of recent events and new developments, I am no longer willing to continue in my capacity as president and earlier today offered my resignation to the MAO Board of Directors.”Randle said his resignation was voluntary and had not been requested by the board of Miss America, which is based in Atlantic City.Hagan did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment on the resignations of Randle, CEO Sam Haskell and Chairman Lynn Weidner. But on her Facebook page, she posted a message asking anyone who was warned away from her to come forward and send her a direct message, in what might be a precursor to legal action against the Miss America Organization or its former officers regarding her post-Miss America work as a pageant interview coach.“If you have ever been told to not work with me, communicate with me, hire me, etc. Will you send me a DM?” she wrote.The scandal began Thursday, when the Huffington Post published leaked emails showing pageant officials ridiculing past Miss Americas, including crass and sometimes vulgar comments about them.The emails included one that used a vulgar term for female genitalia to refer to past Miss America winners, one that wished that a particular former Miss America had died and others that speculated about how many sex partners Hagan has had.Randle noted that the worst communications were exchanged in 2013 and 2014, years before he joined the Miss America Organization, and said the article’s implication of “complicit participation on my part in a years long array of inappropriate email communication” is untrue.Haskell’s resignation is effective immediately, while Randle and Weidner will remain for a few weeks to help with a leadership transition. Dan Meyers, who had been vice chairman of the board, was named interim chairman.The organization announced the resignations a day after dozens of former Miss Americas, including Hagan, signed a petition calling on the group’s leadership to step down because of the emails.The emails already cost the pageant its television production partner and raised questions about the future of the nationally televised broadcast from Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall the week after Labor Day each year. Dick Clark Productions told the AP on Thursday that it cut ties with the Miss America Organization over the emails, calling them “appalling.”Also on Saturday, one of the main recipients of fundraising from the Miss America Organization said it was reviewing its association with Miss America. The Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals said it was “conducting an immediate review of the situation and will take appropriate actions.”And New Jersey officials are reviewing their Miss America Organization contract, in which the state still owes $4 million toward the cost of next year’s pageant.___Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAClast_img read more

Sensex tanks 354 pts HDFC twins succumb to selloff

first_imgMumbai: The BSE benchmark Sensex cracked about 354 points Wednesday, pressured by a sudden sell-off in HDFC and HDFC Bank amid grim global cues. The 30-share Sensex lost 353.87 points, or 0.91 per cent, to close at 38,585.35, while the broader NSE Nifty dropped 87.65 points, or 0.75 per cent, to 11,584.30. HDFC Bank slumped 2.07 per cent, while HDFC lost 1.96 per cent. The HDFC duo collectively accounted for almost half of the Sensex’s 354-point loss. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalTraders said the HDFC duo succumbed to a late-session sell-off following reports of PE giant KKR offloading some stake in the two companies. Market sentiment was also hit by the IMF downgrading the global growth forecast to 3.3 per cent for 2019, they added. Globally, stocks wobbled after US President Donald Trump threatened to slap tariffs on goods imported from the EU, ratcheting up global trade tensions. Other top losers in the Sensex pack included Bharti Airtel, Asian Paints, TCS, HCL Tech, Tata Steel, SBI, IndusInd Bank and Hero MotoCorp, declining up to 3.28 per cent. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostWhile Tata Motors, HUL, Kotak Bank, Coal India, Sun Pharma, M&M, Bajaj Auto and ONGC were the gainers, spurting up to 4.68 per cent. “Sentiments were affected on the news that IMF had lowered global economic growth outlook and fresh trade tensions have erupted between US and EU. Investors also seemed to be cautious awaiting Q4 March 2019 earnings beginning later this week,” said Deepak Jasani, Head- Retail Research, HDFC Securities. The IMF’s World Economic Outlook (WEO) “projects a slowdown in growth in 2019 for 70 per cent of the world economy,” IMF chief economist Gita Gopinath said in a statement. India is projected to grow at 7.3 per cent in 2019 and 7.5 per cent in 2020, reflecting the recent revision to the national account statistics that indicated somewhat softer underlying momentum, the report said. Meanwhile, foreign institutional investors (FIIs) net purchased equity worth Rs 1,212.35 crore Tuesday, while domestic institutional investors (DIIs) sold shares to the tune of Rs 688.65 crore, provisional data available with stock exchanges showed. Elsewhere in Asia, Japan’s Nikkei dropped 0.53 per cent and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng fell 0.13 per cent. Korea’s Kospi rose 0.49 per cent, while Shanghai Composite Index inched up 0.16 per cent. In Europe, Frankfurt’s DAX was up 0.41 per cent, Paris CAC 40 rose 0.38 per cent, and London’s FTSE gained 0.02 per cent in early deals. The benchmark Brent crude futures rose 0.67 per cent to USD 71.08 per barrel. Meanwhile, the rupee appreciated 12 paise to 69.18 against the US dollar intra-day.last_img read more