Governor announces 14 climate change grants

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas today announced that another 14 energy efficiency projects have been selected to receive almost $150,000 in funding from the Vermont Community Climate Change Grant Program. All told, these projects will reduce about 100 tons of greenhouse emissions – the equivalent of taking 16 cars off the road or not burning more than 10,000 galloons of gas, the Governor said.“It’s inspiring to see such strong grass-roots interest in energy efficiency and for doing Vermont’s part to combat climate change,” the Governor said.  “From Shrewsbury to Strafford, Vermonters are making improvements that will not only keep CO2 out of the air, but will also save individuals and taxpayers money.”In one project, Harwood Union High School is teaming up with Freeaire Refrigeration Systems of Warren to significantly reduce the cost and energy needed for the cafeteria’s refrigerators.Freeaire taps into the greatest source of refrigeration ever created: winter.  It uses cold outside air to cool a space, simply by using what nature has so kindly made available, to give the entire compressor system a winter vacation.  The high school expects to reduce CO2 emissions by 10.5 tons per year.Other projects include:Village of Essex Junction: $11,000 for a methane gas recapture system for the wastewater facility, which will provide heat and hot water for the facility. Annual emissions reduction – 9.5 tons.Town of Shrewsbury: $10,832 to upgrade and weatherize the town office and emergency shelter. Annual emissions reduction – 7 tons.Town of South Hero: $9,684 to replace the heating system, upgrade lighting and replace exterior doors at the town office building. Annual emissions reduction – 6.5 tons.Town of Underhill: $12,000 seal and insulate the town hall. Annual emissions reduction – 11.5 tons.Plainfield Fire & Rescue: $12,000 to weatherize the 1854 squad building. Annual emissions reduction – 10 tons.Lamoille Union School District: $12,000 to install photovoltaic panels to power the storage garage for the cross country trails.  Career center students will build the structure and net metering will generate credits for the campus. Annual emissions reduction – 2 tons.Richford Town School District: $12,000 to replace lighting at the high school gym. Annual emissions reduction – 16 tons.Yestermorrow Design/Build School of Warren: $11,850 to install a solar hot water system and create a demonstration project. Annual emissions reduction – 3 tons.Leicester School District: $8204 for lighting upgrades. Annual emissions reduction – 4 tons.Town of Moretown: $12,000 for weatherization and lighting upgrades at the town hall. Annual emissions reduction – 6 tons.Town of Waitsfield: $6515 to insulate and weatherize the Joslin Library. Annual emissions reduction – 6.5 tons.Worcester Historical Society: $9753 to weatherize and insulate the building. Annual emissions reduction – 2.5 tons.United Church of Strafford: $11,810 to install energy efficient lighting and weatherize the parish hall, including “the Ark,” an outdoor playground structure which doubles as a mini-stage for performances. Annual emissions reduction – 4.5 tons. Source: Governor’s office. 9/4/2009last_img read more

Papaya on Zrće was named the sixth best club in the world by DJ Mag

first_imgAnother great recognition comes from the international community – Papaya club located on the beach Zrce has positioned itself as the sixth best club in the world according to DJ MAG, the most influential electronic music magazine.The results of the competition are based on the votes of tens of thousands of club fans from all over the world, and the success is even greater when added to the fact that Papaya made a jump of three places compared to last year, from the previous, also high, ninth place. In first place was the Green Valley Club from Brazil, in second place was USHUAïA in Ibiza and Zouk from Singapore in third place.Apart from Papaya, which took 6th place, Noa Beach Club took 13th place among Croatian clubs, Aquarius is in 25th place, while Kalypso is in 33rd place and Revelin club is in 40th place.In addition to this news, for the destination of the island of Pag, the town of Novalja, but also the whole of Croatia, extremely important tourist news that will certainly affect the increase in visits to the destination, is that in Novalja an investment “boom” is happening. Boutique hotels, resorts and villas are springing up, themed restaurants of world cuisine are opening and the whole destination is experiencing an investment boom. In support of this is the opening of this year’s boutique hotel with 4 * of our national football team member Dejan Lovren on the Novalja waterfront, following the example of his colleague Messi who bought a hotel in Ibiza.Papaya opens its doors to its visitors on May 22 with the popular Summer Opening Festival, which is a symbol of the beginning of an exciting season and an invitation to all local visitors to have fun at the first after beach parties in Croatia.last_img read more

FIFA Report: Ghana provided no info on professional clubs

first_imgIt has emerged that the Ghana FA did not  provide any information to world football governing body, FIFA, over whether or not there were professional football clubs in the country when FIFA was compiling data for its 2019 FIFA Professional Football Report.The report was released on Wednesday and it was to provide updates on what the trends were across the world in FIFA’s member countries.The report looked at the number of professional clubs and players there were in those countries, the formats of their league championships, details of their transfers both incoming and outgoing and the existence of club licensing regulations.On page 62 of the report, the data on Ghana seemed to showed that there were no professional clubs or players in the country.However, a closer examination of the report reveals that the Ghana FA did not provide any information to FIFA on professional clubs and players.The lack of an answer was shows by the use of a dash (-). FIFA explained in the Executive Summary (page 7) of the report that in the event that any Member Association failed to give a response to a question, a dash would be placed there to state that fact.While some expressed doubt over the what was interpreted as the absence of a professional football club in Ghana, others have wondered why the GFA did not provide any answers to FIFA during the data collection phase of the report.What information did Ghana provide?The Ghana FA provided answers to questions over the existence of standard contracts, player associations, league sponsorship, competitions and club licensing regulations.How did FIFA get the information from member associations?FIFA said that it collected the data from member associations between April and October of 2019 and it did so using an online questionnaire.last_img read more

Following Fruits and Vegetables from Farm to Your Table

first_imgStrawberries and baby arugula in January. Broccoli rabe and artichokes in July. We want fruits and vegetables in and out of season at our favorite restaurant and on our dining room table.Produce man Charlie Rooney sums it up best: “Consumers want everything, every day.”Charlie Rooney, left, kids with produce broker Frank Monte at the Philadelphia Produce Market.The Sea Bright produce wholesaler (C. Rooney Pro­duce) has not taken a day off since he started the business in the 1980s and isn’t planning one soon. Several nights a week, you can find Rooney spending the overnight hours on a road trip to the modern South Philadelphia Produce Market.Rooney buys produce for 75 customers so the fruits and vegetables they serve their diners are of the highest quality and freshness.“We arrive at the market around 8 p.m.,” says Rooney, “and it takes about five hours to assemble and stage the orders at one of the 100 bays. Then the hundreds of individual boxes, crates and trays have to be carefully loaded onto the 24-foot straight truck – like a complicated puzzle – in the exact way they will be unloaded for my customers in the hours ahead.”Rooney has his business philosophy on his truck’s sides and roll-up door: Big Enough To Serve, Small Enough To Care.“I live it,” he smiles.He has kept his customer base manageable and in relatively close proximity so that he can assure them when they open for business their order has been delivered and placed in storage in the manner they have specified.“It’s truly personal service,” emphasizes Rooney, who uses two vehicles to deliver when he returns to Mon­mouth County. His team does not finish up until about 10 a.m. – some 16 hours after the trip began. And, they repeat it up to two more times each week – week in, week out.From left, Brandon Gebhardt, Charlie Rooney and Eddie Giron fuel up for the trip to the produce market.The route vegetables and fruits take from farm to plate is a long one but surprisingly quick. Domestic fresh produce leaves farms in the South and West in the winter and nationwide in the summer to arrive at regional produce markets (New York City, Boston, Dallas, Miami, Chicago, and the like) in the middle and end of each week. Fruits and vegetables from Central and South America – shipped by air – are timed for similar arrivals during the winter months.In a 24/7 operation, decades-old family-owned “direct receivers” buy and stock produce at these regional facilities. They inventory boxes, crates, trays and bags of everything from raspberries to radishes, apples to artichokes.Many supermarkets have buyers who purchase for multiple stores or by region. Large warehouse stores like Costco, BJ’s and Walmart may bypass the produce markets entirely and deal directly with growers on mega-purchases to be distributed nationally. Restaur­ants, Rooney explains, still establish relationships with local or regional wholesalers who supply their needs daily and weekly.What makes small businesses like Rooney’s unique is how the relationship with customers transcends just business.“I know all my customers on a first-name basis,” he says, “and have dealt with them for years,” as he shakes a large ring with dozens of keys. “These are keys to my customers’ buildings and I deliver to their storerooms during the middle of the night, placing their order where they want it so it is not in the way when they arrive early for their business day.”The path these fresh commodities then take to your table is varied. “I have long-term relationships with the family produce companies,” he says. “I have worked with a Philadelphia broker for decades. He assures I get what I want for my customers at the right price.”Although Rooney has bought direct from the receivers, he and much of his competition now work closely with professional buyers. Rooney met second-generation Philadelphia produce broker Frank Monte nearly 20 years ago and has established a strong business partnership.“Let me explain how it works,” Rooney says as the truck rumbles down I-295 toward the City of Brotherly Love on Monday night. “I call my orders into Monte just before I leave for the market. Frank sources all my orders from one of the two dozen receivers at the center looking not only for the best price but the best quality.” Rooney explains that Monte knows the market and has an eye on what is coming in daily that Rooney regularly buys.When Rooney’s truck arrives at the loading dock, Monte has his orders sourced and instructions (picking tickets) waiting for Rooney’s assistants. Eddie Giron has been with Rooney for 20 years. Brandon Gephardt has been aboard about two years. Both men snooze in the truck cab on the way to the market knowing they have a long night and morning ahead.Driving motorized forklifts, Giron and Gephardt whiz around the market like race car drivers picking up orders. After schmoozing with the night sales staff and Monte, Rooney retreats to the cab of the truck for three hours of sleep. “Not many owners of produce companies are the buyer, the driver and delivery person,” he says. “I need to catch 40 winks to be able to drive back to Monmouth County refreshed and ready to make deliveries.”Rooney emphasizes how important it is to get the truck loaded correctly. “We don’t have time to be looking for two boxes of asparagus on the third stop in New Jersey at 3 a.m. at a customer’s back door. It has to be where we can get it as soon as we stop.”Rooney starts making deliveries soon after he crosses into New Jersey. The strawberries for a customer in Howell need to be where he can put his hands on them a few hours later. A large sub shop chain needs lettuce and tomatoes – and lots of them – as soon as they open for the breakfast crowd. Customers not only get their produce but bills so they know costs immediately allowing them to price and plan accordingly.Sea Bright produce wholesaler Charlie Rooney starts down the long, center aisle at the South Philadelphia Produce Market.The Rooney family arrived in Sea Bright from Jersey City in 1962. Charlie Rooney’s dad, the late Charles Jr., served as a councilman for years and mayor of the town for two terms. His mom Frances has staffed the family hot dog cart on Ocean Avenue since the late 1970s. It had been the summer job growing up for young Rooney and his sister Fran. Mrs. Rooney, now 80, shows no sign of closing the (what is now) Sea Bright institution. “Like my mother Frances, I am a Capricorn,” Rooney says, “and I am a workaholic, a lot like her and will probably be working too into my 80s.”Rooney got into the business by accident. While recovering from a serious knee injury suffered training for a triathlon, he began to sell vegetables from a road stand near the hot dog cart.“I was paying way too much for vegetables from a wholesaler,” he said. With guidance from people in the business, Rooney began to buy his own produce from a wholesale market in Newark. “When fall arrived, I needed to find something to replace the road stand,” he said. The manager of Ichabod’s (now Woody’s) in Sea Bright asked Rooney to supply him with the juice oranges he used for his famous screwdriver cocktail. Rooney found a supplier, made the sale and as he quips, “one customer led to two, three four and the rest is history.”In 1996 Rooney and his wife Marisol purchased a small deli opposite The Grove on Broad Street in Shrews­bury. They renamed it Stroker’s. Today, the small deli has a huge following for quality breakfast and lunch fare. And yes, Rooney keeps his wife well supplied with produce.Rooney feels he is one of a dying breed of family-owned produce wholesalers. “Today, everyone wants to be bigger,” he says. “My philosophy is to stay the right size to serve my customers’ different needs. I want them to succeed and prosper and if they do well, I too will do well. It’s a win-win situation.”“It’s a demanding business but I love it,” says Rooney heading for home for some needed sleep. He’d have it no other way.Feature writer Art Petro­semolo spent an overnight with Rooney and crew jammed into the cab of his truck. He walked wide-eyed through the Philadelphia Market and came away (along with a huge tray of fresh strawberries) with a new respect for how his vegetables arrive on his plate each day. By Art PetrosemoloSea Bright’s Charlie Rooney is ‘The Produce Man’last_img read more

Hockey Canada decides to ban bodychecking in peewee division

first_imgHockey Night in Canada icon Don Cherry is not in favour of Hockey Canada’s recent decision to ban body checking at the peewee level.During his Coaches Corner segment Saturday, Cherry disagreed with Hockey Canada’s decision to ban bodychecking for peewee players saying young players will be ill-prepared and unsafe when physical contact is introduced at higher levels. “You [Hockey Canada] have good intentions, but hey listen, the road to hell is paved with good intentions,” he said on his Hockey Night in Canada segment. “You’re gonna be sorry. You watch and see, you will be sorry.”The decision came during Hockey Canada’s 94th Annual General Meeting in Charlottetown P.E.I.The meeting was attended by more than 250 delegates from across the country.The new body-checking rule change approved at 2013 Hockey Canada Annual General Meeting reads:• A modification to playing rule 6.2b was approved, removing body-checking from Peewee levels and below within leagues governed by Hockey Canada, starting in 2013-14. * In addition to this rule change, a work group has been directed to build a mandatory national checking and instructional resource program to support the progressive implementation of checking skills at the Novice to Peewee levels to better prepare players for body-checking at the Bantam and Midget level.last_img read more