MICHELLE WILLIAMS TO APPEAR IN GREASE THE MUSICAL IN TORONTO

first_img Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisement Singer-songwriter Michelle Williams of Destiny’s Child fame will appear in a Toronto production of “Grease: The Musical.”Producers say she’ll make a cameo as Teen Angel in the show from June 19-23.The production runs until July 8 at the Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre Centre. Singer-songwriter Michelle Williams of Destiny’s Child fame will appear in a Toronto production of “Grease: The Musical.” Producers say she’ll make a cameo as Teen Angel in the show from June 19-23. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Matt Sayles Facebookcenter_img Advertisement Williams is among several celebrities making a cameo in the role of Teen Angel for the show.The others are Mark Ballas of “Dancing with the Stars,” country musician George Canyon, and actor-singers Logan Henderson and Drake Bell.The role of Teen Angel includes the singing of “Beauty School Dropout.”Williams has plenty of theatre experience, having acted on Broadway and London’s West End. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementlast_img read more

ELLEN DEGENERES IS COMING TO VANCOUVER FOR A QA SESSION THIS FALL

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement One of televisions most exciting talk-show hosts is coming to Vancouver for a Q&A session.Ellen DeGeneres, host of The Ellen DeGeneres Show and voice of Finding Nemo‘s Dory, is bringing her smiling, dancing, pranking, and fun-loving personality to Rogers Arena for a one-night-only show, A Conversation With Ellen DeGeneres. Known for her quick wit and punchy sense of humour, Ellen has been winning over audiences ever since she first appeared on the sitcom Ellen back in 1994. She has been hosting her talk show since 2003, winning 10 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Talk Show/Entertainment – holding the record for the category. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The Q&A at Rogers Arena will take place on Friday, October 19, and is being presented by TD Bank and hosted by the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade.Ellen’s visit to Vancouver will be only her second Canadian show, as she also stopped by Calgary this past April.Tickets go on sale to public starting Wednesday, August 15 at 10 am.Prices have not yet been posted for the Vancouver show, though a similar event in Calgary saw tickets going for $104 to $314.A Conversation With Ellen DeGeneres Vancouver show 2018When: Friday, October 19, 2018Time: 7 pmWhere: Rogers Arena — 800 Griffiths Way, VancouverTickets: Available online starting Wednesday, August 15 at 10 am Facebook Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

JUST FOR LAUGHS GILBERT ROZONS SEX CRIME HEARING DRAWS PROTESTERS BUT ACCUSED

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With: Rozon, 64, was charged in December with rape and indecent assault. The allegations come from a single female complainant and date back to 1979.Rozon is also facing a $10-million class-action lawsuit alleging that he abused at least 20 women between 1982 and 2016. Last August, the Quebec Court of Appeal allowed Rozon to appeal the decision authorizing the lawsuit. The appeal has not yet been heard.Rozon, who denies any wrongdoing, stepped down as president of Just For Laughs last year, and an investor group bought the company in the spring.THE CANADIAN PRESS Demonstrators mark International Women’s Day in front of the courthouse to protest against Just for Laughs founder Gilbert Rozon, who is charged with sex related crimes, Friday, March 8, 2019 in Montreal. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz) MONTREAL – Protesters gathered outside the Montreal courthouse today for a scheduled appearance by Gilbert Rozon on sex crime charges, but the Just for Laughs founder never showed, choosing to be represented by his lawyer.A judge granted a request by Rozon’s lawyer Pierre Poupart that the case be put off until April 25.With the court date coinciding with International Women’s Day, a few dozen people protested outside. Dominique Daigneault, a union president, said the protest was a reminder that full equality of the sexes has not been reached and that women are still victims of violence.center_img Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

RYAN REYNOLDS TO PRODUCE NEW TV GAME SHOW

first_imgMandatory Credit: Photo by Brent N Clarke/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock (9671400an)Actor Ryan Reynolds attends a special screening of “Deadpool 2” at AMC Loews Lincoln Square, in New YorkNY Special Screening of “Deadpool 2”, New York, USA – 14 May 2018 Advertisement Facebook Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twittercenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: The Deadpool star has signed on to develop an original series called Don’t, described as a “comedic physical game show” featuring families of four as they tackle a variety of mental and physical tasks for cash prizes.The only rule of the game is having to abide by the one thing they are told not to do, such as “don’t slip,” “don’t scream,” or “don’t laugh”. One member of the family will be eliminated from the team each time they fail to complete a challenge, until they are all wiped out.Reynolds will work on the show for U.S. executives at ABC, reports Variety. The new gig marks his return to the TV network after previously rising to fame as one of the stars of their hit sitcom Two Guys, a Girl, and a Pizza Place, which aired from 1998 to 2001.last_img read more

ROXODUS ORGANIZERS UNDER INVESTIGATION FOR ALLEGEDLY DESTROYING PROTECTED FOREST WETLANDS

first_imgRoxodus Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisement Advertisement Organizers of the now-defunct Roxodus music festival are under investigation and could face fines and charges after mowing down trees and draining wetlands to make room for the four-day concert that was abruptly cancelled earlier this month.“There were environmentally protected lands that were impacted by these guys,” said Doug Measures, mayor of the Township of Clearview.The investigation has been launched by the Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority (NVCA) and, according to officials from the County of Simcoe, it could result in charges under the municipality’s forestry conservation bylaw. Officials said 18 hectares of woodlands were cleared without the proper permits or prior approval. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebooklast_img read more

IM ON THE MEND ALEX TREBEK SAYS HES DONE WITH CHEMOTHERAPY

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Canadian “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek says he’s “on the mend” after completing treatment for pancreatic cancer.In a new video posted on the “Jeopardy!” Facebook and YouTube pages, the Sudbury, Ont.-born TV personality says he’s “gone through a lot of chemotherapy and thankfully that is now over.”The video follows the 79-year-old around on set and behind the scenes of the hit quiz show as it prepares for its season 36 premiere on Sept. 9. In this April 30, 2017 file photo, Alex Trebek speaks at the 44th annual Daytime Emmy Awards at the Pasadena Civic Center in Pasadena, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)center_img Trebek looks sprightly as he interacts with the audience and explains his excitement for the next season, and is even seen doing a few push-ups on a chair behind the scenes.Trebek announced in a YouTube video on March 6 that he had been diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer.He vowed to keep working and beat the low survival rate statistics for the disease.“I’m on the mend and that’s all I can hope for right now,” Trebek says in the new video posted Thursday.“We have some exciting things coming up and I can’t wait to share them with all of you. Let me tell you, it’s going to be a good year.”THE CANADIAN PRESS Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

Texas white buffalo hunt triggers outrage

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe birth of a white buffalo in many cultures is said to be a sign that people from different cultures will unite.But in the U.S., however, Native American groups are up in arms because a Texas ranch offers hunters a chance to bag the sacred animal for sport.APTN National News reporter Meagan Fiddler has this story.last_img

Ottawas mishandling of Jordans Principle means gaps delays and denials for First

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsThe Canadian Human Rights Tribunal has ordered for the full implementation of Jordan’s Principle to ensure equal healthcare for Indigenous children in a decision released Tuesday.The order was part of the long-awaited ruling released Tuesday that detailed how Canada discriminates against Indigenous people in its policies and funding of child welfare on-reserve.The goal of Jordan’s Principle is to ensure Indigenous children on-reserve have equal access to healthcare.“(Indigenous Affairs) is also ordered to cease applying its narrow definition of Jordan’s Principle and to take measures to immediately implement the full meaning and scope of Jordan’s principle,” the tribunal said in its 182-page. “More than just funding, there is a need to refocus the policy of the program to respect human rights principles and sound social work practice.”Who pays for health services on-reserve – the province, Indigenous and Northern Affairs, or Health Canada – can be complicated. Jordan’s Principle dictates care for the child first and fight over who pays later.Despite the House of Commons unanimously adopting Jordan’s Principle in 2007, Indigenous Affairs went on to define the principle so narrowly, that it said no cases existed.‎The human rights tribunal didn’t agree.“Such an approach defeats the purpose of Jordan’s Principle and results in service gaps, delays and denials for First Nations children on reserve,” the decision said.Jordan’s Principle is named after Jordan River Anderson, a young boy with severe special needs from Manitoba’s remote Norway House Cree Nation. He died in hospital while the province and federal government fought over his care. He never got to see his home.Ottawa came up with a complicated definition. It only applied the principle to situations in which there was a dispute between the federal government and the province over who should pay for a service needed by a child on-reserve with multiple disabilities requiring multiple health services.“It is Health Canada’s and AANDC’s narrow interpretation of Jordan’s Principle that results in there being no cases meeting the criteria for Jordan’s Principle,” the tribunal ruled. “Jordan’s Principle is meant to apply to all First Nations children. There are many other First Nations children without multiple disabilities who require services, including child and family services. Having to put a child in care in order to access those services, when those services are available to all other Canadians is one of the main reasons this Complaint was made.”Tribunal panel members heard hundreds of hours of testimony over 76 days of hearings. Thousands of documents were submitted in a fight that began in 2007 when Cindy Blackstock, a First Nations’ child welfare advocate along with Assembly of First Nations, filed a human rights complaint.The panel found Canada’s position “unreasonable, unconvincing and not supported by the preponderance of evidence in this case.”In an interview last December, Blackstock said documents show a federal bureaucracy working to protect politicians over the needs of Indigenous children.“It’s very clear to me they completely didn’t get it,” Blackstock said at the time. “Or even if they did get it, they felt the moral course was to deny children services and I think that’s unconscionable. There shouldn’t be more red tape for them to jump, there shouldn’t be longer waits. They shouldn’t be denied services because they’re First Nations’ children.”Three years ago, Mi’kmaw woman Maurina Beadle, took the federal government to court for not providing equal healthcare services for her son Jeremy Meawasige, who has special needs.When Beadle had a stroke in 2010, her band the Pictou Landing First Nation in Nova Scotia, picked up the tab for Jeremy’s extra home care. But argued that it was a cost Ottawa should cover. And not doing so made it a case of Jordan’s Principle.The courts agreed. Beadle won her case.A year later, Ottawa appealed. And an internal federal document puts that decision squarely at the feet of then Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, who was defeated in October’s election.“Minister Valcourt, the federal lead for Jordan’s Principle, decided to have the Crown appeal the decision on May 6, 2013, on the principle that the Judge erred in his interpretation of JP,” noted a memo labelled “secret.”Ottawa had consistently argued no cases of Jordan’s Principle existed.Emails between federal officials at Health Canada paint a different picture.“There will likely be more cases coming forward so we will definitely need a good tracking system,” the documents said.Blackstock pointed to a April 15, 2013 document, which summarizes a call between officials with Health Canada and Aboriginal and Northern Affairs discussing how to narrow the impact of Beadle’s court victory.The memo detailed how two bureaucrats decided the Pictou Landing case “will be labelled as a JP case, that way it can be treated as an isolated case and the interim remedy can be limited to this case alone.”Blackstock said that document showed how the Harper government saw Jordan’s Principle as a way of limiting the services for kids.A lot has changed since these emails and briefing notes were volleyed back and forth between bureaucrats. The Liberals now form a majority government.The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has issued its report. Recommendation Number 3: “We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.”In its decision, the tribunal left the remedies – how government should fix this problem – for a later date. Reaction from the Liberal Government is still to come.Blackstock and the Assembly of First Nations will hold a press conference later Tuesday.Back in December, when Blackstock still had her fingers crossed over the tribunal decision, she said whatever changes happen, it’s not just about more money for child welfare and health services for First Nations.“The bureaucracy is still in place,” said Blackstock. “And their particular goal appears to be to have protected the minister and they didn’t make the effort to really ensure that children were the focal point of benefitting from federal services. I’m hoping we see that change.For Blackstock, it’s a matter of making sure that memo makes it through the red tape.“I’m hoping the federal government immediately instructs the bureaucrats to make sure these changes reach down into the levels of kids,” she said.troache@aptn.calast_img read more

In Nunavut some people are encouraged to call family when in trouble

first_imgKent Driscoll APTN National NewsQuestions are being raised about whether the Ottawa police should be called in to investigate any incidents involving RCMP and civilians.That’s because of racist comments that were posted by a Staff Sgt in the Ottawa police service.But others say it doesn’t really matter – because they don’t trust the RCMP enough to call them in the first place if something is happening.kdriscoll@aptn.calast_img

Liberals to spend more on Indigenous children

first_imgTodd LamirandeAPTN NewsPart of the federal Liberal government’s pre-election budget will spend more on Indigenous children.The party plans to put more money into everything from social services to education to healthcare.Especially, it says, the program known as Jordan’s Principle, which is supposed to even the treatment field for children with disabilities.last_img

Projects honouring MMIWG gets 13M in federal funding

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsThe federal government is committing $13 million to fund more than 100 projects commemorating the lives of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada.“The point of this commemoration fund is to ensure that the stories of our stolen sisters are put in their rightful place in Canada’s history,” said Women and Gender Equality Minister Maryam Monsef at an announcement in Winnipeg Monday.Monsef added the projects will also help toward healing for families.Money for the fund comes after the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls called on the government to create a commemoration fund in its interim report released in 2017.In total, 105 projects were approved by an external indigenous review committee said Monsef.Those projects include art installations and exhibits, productions such as movies and operas, as well as creating safe spaces for women.Communities were tasked with submitting proposals outlining the project and costs.When it came to proposals Monsef says there was only one condition.“Families are at the heart of this… commemorations had to have a letter of support from families,” she said.One of those family members is Angela Lavallee.Lavallee testified at the Vancouver hearings about her nine-month-old granddaughter who died in 2015.Lavallee says a coroner concluded the cause of death undetermined but the family doesn’t accept this conclusion.She teamed up with Manitoba Moon Voices, a grassroots organization in Manitoba, to propose a structure that will sit on Winnipeg’s frozen Red River in the winter.The structure will be apart of a series of warming huts designed to act as a shelter along the city’s popular Red River skating trail.It will be in the shape of a woman and will act as an educational tool for people passing by.“We want to be able to draw in community outside of our own community so we want her to sit on the river,” said Lavallee. “Just resilient. Kind of like the symbolization of Indigenous women themselves.”In the summer Lavallee hopes the structure can rest on a piece of land at The Forks.The Manitoba Inuit Association put forth a proposal for The Red Amautiit Project, which will see a team from the organization travel to communities in Nunavut and northern Labrador to work with locals on a traditional sewing project.The amautiit or amaut (singular) is a traditional Inuit women’s parka designed with a large pouch in the back where mothers carry their children.“It symbolizes women and girls and as we know the red dress is the commemorative symbol for MMIWG,” said Rachel Dutton, executive director of the Manitoba Inuit Association.“Inuit really want to create that space for their stories and experiences.”Dutton says The Red Amautiit Project will open up the space for Inuit women to share their traditional teachings.She hopes to see it become either a traveling exhibit or placed as a permanent exhibit in a museum in the future.Projects will be rolled out over the next two years.bhobson@aptn.ca@bhobs22last_img read more

Markets Right Now Stocks end mostly higher

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – The latest on developments in financial markets (All times local):4 p.m.Stocks struggled to a mostly higher finish on Wall Street as gains for energy, phone and industrial companies made up for losses elsewhere.The Dow Jones industrial average was held back by a loss in Apple. Other indexes closed higher.Hess and Verizon each rose 2 per cent.Some health insurers turned higher as support dwindled for the Senate Republicans’ latest effort to roll back the Affordable Care Act. Molina Healthcare jumped 4.5 per cent.The Standard & Poor’s 500 rose 1 point, or 0.1 per cent, to 2,502.The Dow fell 9 points, less than 0.1 per cent, to 22,349. The Nasdaq rose 4 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 6,426.Small-company stocks did better than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 rose 6 points, or 0.5 per cent, to 1,450, a record.___11:45 a.m.Stock indexes are slightly lower in midday trading on Wall Street as the market heads for its second decline in a row.Health care and technology stocks pulled the market lower Friday. UnitedHealth, a major insurer, dropped 2.2 per cent and Apple gave up 1.7 per cent.Banks also fell. Bank of America lost 1.2 per cent.Sprint jumped 4.6 per cent after Reuters reported it was getting close to signing a deal with T-Mobile.The Standard & Poor’s 500 slipped 2 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 2,498.The Dow Jones industrials fell 13 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 22,343. The Nasdaq lost 7 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 6,415.Small-company stocks did better than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 index rose 4 points, or 0.3 per cent, to 1,448.___9:35 a.m.Stocks are opening slightly lower on Wall Street as technology companies and banks decline.Apple fell another 1 per cent early Friday as investors give a tepid reception to its new lineup of iPhones.Financial stocks are down as bond yields decline. Bank of America lost 1.2 per cent.Sprint jumped 4 per cent after Reuters reported it was getting close to signing a deal with T-Mobile.The Standard & Poor’s 500 slipped 2 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 2,498.The Dow Jones industrials fell 13 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 22,343. The Nasdaq lost 7 points, or 0.1 per cent, to 6,415.Bond prices rose as tensions with North Korea escalated. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.25 per cent.last_img read more

Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (16,039.26, down 42.83 points)Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Healthcare. Up 60 cents, or 14.85 per cent, to $4.64 on 39.02 million shares.Canopy Growth Corp. (TSX:WEED). Healthcare. Up 63 cents, or 3.26 per cent, to $19.98 on 9.3 million shares.Aimia Inc. (TSX:AIM). Loyalty programs. Up 41 cents, or 14.64 per cent, to $3.21 on 6.04 million shares.Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE). Oil and gas. Down 16 cents, 1.11 per cent, to $14.28 on 5.4 million shares.Obsidian Energy Ltd. (TSX:OBE). Oil and gas. Up two cents, 1.32 per cent, to $1.53 on 3.9 million shares.NexGen Energy Ltd. (TSX:NXE). Miner. Down 11 cents, or 3.62 per cent, to $2.93 on 3.8 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (TSX:CNQ). Oil and gas. Up 11 cents, or 0.24 per cent, to $46.30 on 1.9 million shares. The company is considering adding a 30,000- to 40,000-barrel-per-day bitumen-only project to its Horizon oilsands mine to take advantage of excess ore production and pipeline capacity. The proposed project could be approved as early as 2019 and would continue a trend in the sector to bolt on brownfield production to avoid the high costs and risks of building new mines from scratch.Hydro One Ltd. (TSX:H). Utilities. Down 27 cents, or 1.17 per cent, to $22.71 on 444,246 shares. Ontario’s largest electricity distributor says its third-quarter profit was down six per cent from last year as a result of costs associated with the proposed $6.7-billion acquisition of Avista Corp., a U.S. utility company based in Spokane, Wash. Profit attributable to common shareholders was $219 million (37 cents per share), down from $233 million (40 cents per share) last year. Excluding the costs associated with Avista, Hydro One’s adjusted profit was up two per cent at $237 million.last_img read more

Sales tax not the answer to Albertas fiscal woes Finance minister

first_imgEDMONTON – Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci says he is not considering introducing a sales tax to help cure the province’s financial woes because Albertans don’t support it.Ceci says the idea of a sales tax came up today when he had a roundtable meeting with economists but says having no provincial sales tax reflects, in his words, “the mindset of Albertans.”Ceci says the province will continue to try to reduce spending and grow the economy with an eye to balancing the budget by 2023.Alberta is on track for a $10.3-billion deficit this year and more than $42 billion in debt by next spring.Economist Robert Kavcic with BMO Capital Markets says Alberta’s low tax regime gives it room to manoeuvre and, from an economic perspective, a consumption tax is the best way to ensure a stable base of revenue in tough times.Opposition Alberta Party interim leader Greg Clark says the province should have a conversation around a sales tax, adding people will accept such a levy if the government can demonstrate it will use the money prudently.last_img read more

3 Miss America officials resign 1 apologizes to exwinner

first_imgATLANTIC CITY, N.J. – The top leadership of the Miss America Organization, implicated in an email scandal that targeted past pageant winners for abuse based on their appearance, intellect and sex lives, resigned on Saturday, with the outgoing president apologizing to a winner whose weight he ridiculed.The president, Josh Randle, told The Associated Press his comment responding to an email to his private account about the physical appearance of 2013 winner Mallory Hagan came months before he started working for the Miss America Organization in 2015. But he said it was wrong.“I apologize to Mallory for my lapse in judgment,” Randle said on Saturday. “It does not reflect my values or the values I worked to promote at the Miss America Organization. Although this terrible situation was not caused or driven by me, in light of recent events and new developments, I am no longer willing to continue in my capacity as president and earlier today offered my resignation to the MAO Board of Directors.”Randle said his resignation was voluntary and had not been requested by the board of Miss America, which is based in Atlantic City.Hagan did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment on the resignations of Randle, CEO Sam Haskell and Chairman Lynn Weidner. But on her Facebook page, she posted a message asking anyone who was warned away from her to come forward and send her a direct message, in what might be a precursor to legal action against the Miss America Organization or its former officers regarding her post-Miss America work as a pageant interview coach.“If you have ever been told to not work with me, communicate with me, hire me, etc. Will you send me a DM?” she wrote.The scandal began Thursday, when the Huffington Post published leaked emails showing pageant officials ridiculing past Miss Americas, including crass and sometimes vulgar comments about them.The emails included one that used a vulgar term for female genitalia to refer to past Miss America winners, one that wished that a particular former Miss America had died and others that speculated about how many sex partners Hagan has had.Randle noted that the worst communications were exchanged in 2013 and 2014, years before he joined the Miss America Organization, and said the article’s implication of “complicit participation on my part in a years long array of inappropriate email communication” is untrue.Haskell’s resignation is effective immediately, while Randle and Weidner will remain for a few weeks to help with a leadership transition. Dan Meyers, who had been vice chairman of the board, was named interim chairman.The organization announced the resignations a day after dozens of former Miss Americas, including Hagan, signed a petition calling on the group’s leadership to step down because of the emails.The emails already cost the pageant its television production partner and raised questions about the future of the nationally televised broadcast from Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall the week after Labor Day each year. Dick Clark Productions told the AP on Thursday that it cut ties with the Miss America Organization over the emails, calling them “appalling.”Also on Saturday, one of the main recipients of fundraising from the Miss America Organization said it was reviewing its association with Miss America. The Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals said it was “conducting an immediate review of the situation and will take appropriate actions.”And New Jersey officials are reviewing their Miss America Organization contract, in which the state still owes $4 million toward the cost of next year’s pageant.___Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAClast_img read more

Government seeks increased public and Indigenous participation for resource projects

first_imgThe Province hopes the environmental assessment process will enhance the public’s and Indigenous participation if passed, by keeping the First Nations communities more engaged and involved.“Having Indigenous collaboration from the beginning means a more certain and efficient process where good projects can move forward more quickly, providing benefits to Indigenous peoples while respecting their rights, values and culture,” said Heyman. “We want to reduce the potential for the types of legal challenges we’ve too frequently seen in B.C. These have impacted our province’s economic development, eroded public trust, alienated Indigenous communities and left project proponents trying to navigate through a costly, time-consuming process.”With more open engagement from the public and First Nations groups the Government will be able to better understand the needs of all parties included before making formal decisions.Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs“I am relieved that the day has finally come when we are beginning to see the legislative and policy shifts that are necessary and essential to facilitate genuine reconciliation. Recognizing Indigenous governments, laws, jurisdictions and decision-making is an essential part of this, and the legislation today is a small step in the right direction. The Province of British Columbia has committed to fully implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, including free, prior and informed consent, and we are looking forward to seeing this realized on the ground through environmental assessments under the new process. We are hopeful that the new legislation will ensure the sustainability of our precious lands and waters for our children and grandchildren and all British Columbians. While much more legislative and policy change is urgently needed, today is a good day.” VICTORIA B.C. – The B.C. government introduced legislation to modernize the environmental assessment process for resource projects.In 1995 B.C. was one of the first provinces to introduce environmental assessment legislation, a system for responsible resource projects, reconciliation with B.C.’s Indigenous peoples, environmental protection, increased transparency and increased public engagement.“By revitalizing our environmental assessment process, we’re striking a better balance for our province, where good projects that respect B.C.’s environment, Indigenous peoples and the public will be approved more quickly,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “Our province was built upon the wealth of natural resources at our disposal. This legislation reaffirms the continued importance of these resources to British Columbians and enhances public trust by engaging people and communities early to ensure our resources are used sustainably. Growing a strong economy and protecting the environment we all cherish go hand in hand. That’s the legacy we want our kids and grandkids to inherit.”last_img read more

Fort St John continues to see increase in Real Estate despite Regional

first_imgBCNREB President, Leah Mayer, says the Northern Region continued to see a decrease of 7.64 percent in sales, but a 5.55 percent increase in active listings.“Many of the communities in our Board region saw a decrease in the number of sales and the number of listings. Overall the sales activity has decreased by 7.64 percent, and the number of active listings has increased by 5.55 percent.”Despite the decrease in most Northern markets for the first half of 2019, the Fort St. John market saw an increase of 258 property sales with an overall value of $85.4 million in comparison to the 2018 number of 243.As of June 30, there were 687 properties of all types available for purchase in Fort St. John.For more information, you visit the B.C. Northern Real Estate Board’s website. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The B.C. Northern Real Estate Board has released its listing statistics for the second quarter of 2019.Within the first six months of 2019, the Real Estate Board has reported 2,298 with a value of $716.5 million.This compares with 2,488 sales worth $680.2 million in the first half of 2018.last_img read more